Introduction to a History of the Factory System

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R. Bentley, 1886 - 441 pages

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Page 142 - And a river went out of Eden to water the garden; and from thence it was parted, and became into four heads.
Page 92 - The mother of Sisera looked out at a window, and cried through the lattice, " Why is his chariot so long in coming? why tarry the wheels of his chariots ? " Her wise ladies answered her, yea, she returned answer to herself, "Have they not sped?
Page 161 - And I will bring the third part through the fire, And will refine them as silver is refined, And will try them as gold is tried: They shall call on my name, and I will hear them : I will say, It is my people: And they shall say, The Lord is my God.
Page 352 - The more carefully we examine the history of the past, the more reason shall we find to dissent from those who imagine that our age has been fruitful of new social evils. The truth is that the evils are, with scarcely an exception, old. That which is new is the intelligence which discerns and the humanity which remedies them.
Page 343 - On the best lines of communication the ruts were deep, the descents precipitous, and the way often such as it was hardly possible to distinguish, in the dusk, from the unenclosed heath and fen which lay on both sides.
Page 404 - It was no uncommon thing for a weaver to walk three or four miles in a morning, and call on five or six spinners, before he could collect weft to serve him for the remainder of the day ; and when he wished to weave a piece in a shorter time than usual, a new ribbon, or gown, was necessary to quicken the exertions of the spinner.
Page 398 - An eminent manufacturer in that age," said he, " used to be in his warehouse before six in the morning, accompanied by his children and apprentices. At seven they all came in to breakfast, which consisted of one large dish of water-pottage, made of oatmeal, water, and a little salt, boiled thick, and poured into a dish. At the side was a pan or basin of milk, and the master and apprentices, each with a wooden spoon in his hand, without loss of time, dipped into the same dish, and thence into the...
Page 352 - It may here be noticed that the practice of setting children prematurely to work, a practice which the state, the legitimate protector of those who cannot protect themselves, has, in our time, wisely and humanely interdicted, prevailed in the seventeenth century to an extent which, when compared with the extent of the manufacturing system, seems almost incredible. At Norwich, the chief seat of the clothing trade, a little creature of six years old was thought fit for labour.
Page 342 - Could the England of 1685 be, by some magical process, set before our eyes, we should not know one landscape in a hundred or one building in ten thousand.
Page 431 - This brought on a conversation on the subject, in which the Manchester gentlemen unanimously agreed that the thing was impracticable ; and in defence of their opinion they adduced arguments which I...

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