A Concise Treatise on the Art of Angling: Confirmed by Actual Experience; Interspersed with Several New and Recent Discoveries, Etc

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T. Plummer, 1807 - 186 pages
 

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Page 141 - O'er which he kindly spreads his spacious wing, And hatches plenty for th' ensuing spring ; Nor then destroys it with too fond a stay, Like mothers which their infants overlay ; Nor with a sudden and impetuous wave, Like profuse kings, resumes the wealth he gave. No unexpected inundations spoil...
Page 44 - And looking lively gratitude. At last, The clouds consign their treasures to the fields ; And, softly shaking on the dimpled pool Prelusive drops, let all their moisture flow, In large effusion, o'er the freshened world. The stealing shower is scarce to patter heard, By such as wander through the forest walks, Beneath the' umbrageous multitude of leaves.
Page 141 - Brings home to us, and makes both Indies ours ; Finds wealth where 'tis, bestows it where it wants, Cities in deserts, woods in cities, plants. So that to us no thing, no place, is strange, While his fair bosom is the world's...
Page 28 - The worm that draws a long immod'rate size The trout abhors, and the rank morsel flies; And if too small, the naked fraud's in sight, And fear forbids, while hunger does invite. Those baits will best reward the fisher's pains...
Page 134 - Let no presuming impious railer tax Creative Wisdom , as if aught was form'd In vain, or not for admirable ends.
Page 172 - When down the steep of heav'n he drives the day : For oft we find him finishing his race, With various colours erring on his face. If fiery red his glowing globe descends, High winds and furious tempests he portends : But, if his cheeks are swoln with livid blue, He bodes wet weather by his...
Page 138 - With eye attentive mark the springing game. Straight as above the surface of the flood They wanton rise, or urged by hunger leap, Then fix, with gentle twitch, the barbed hook...
Page 172 - With sharpened horns if glorious then she shine, Next day, not only that, but all the moon, Till her revolving race be wholly run, Are void of tempests, both by land and sea ; And sailors in the port their promised vow shall pay.
Page 138 - Behoves you then to ply your finest art. Long time he, following cautious, scans the fly, And oft attempts to seize it, but as oft The dimpled water speaks his jealous fear. At last, while haply o'er the shaded Sun Passes a cloud, he desperate takes the death, With sullen plunge. At once he darts along, Deep struck, and runs out all the lengthen'd line ; Then seeks the farthest ooze, the sheltering weed, The cavern'd bank, his old secure abode, And flies aloft, and flounces round the pool, Indignant...
Page 172 - Foretells the change of weather in the skies : For, if he rise unwilling to his race, Clouds on his brow, and spots upon his face, Or if through mists he shoots his sullen beams, Frugal of light, in loose and straggling streams, Suspect a drizzling day, with southern rain, Fatal to fruits and flocks, and promis'd grain.

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