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BALL-DANCING, &c.

Floating like light clouds 'twixt our gaze and heaven—
The many twinkling feet, so small and sylph-like,
Suggesting the more secret symmetry
Of the fair forms which terminate so well.

BYRON'S Marino Faliero.

9. When gas and beauty's blended rays
Set hearts and ball-rooms in a blaze;
Or spermaceti's light reveals

More "inward bruises" than it heals;
In flames each belle her victim kills,
And "sparks fly upward" in quadrilles.

HON. NICH. BIDDLE'S Ode to Bogle.
10. Such grace and such beauty! dear creature! you'd swear,
When her delicate feet in the dance twinkled round,
That her steps are of light-that her home is the air,
And she only par complaisance touches the ground!

MOORE.

11.

And turn from gentle Juliet's woe,
To count the twirls of Fanny Ellsler's toe.

SPRAGUE'S Curiosity.

12. The bright and youthful dancers meet,
With laughing lips and winged feet;
And golden locks come flashing by,
Like sudden sunshine thro' the sky.

MRS. C. H. W. ESLING'S Broken Bracelet.

13. And fairy forms, now here, now there, Hover'd like children of the air.

MRS. C. H. W. ESLING'S Broken Bracelet.

14. Of all that did chance, 't were a long tale to tell,
Of the dancers and dresses, and who was the belle;
But each was so happy, and all were so fair,
That night stole away, and the dawn caught them there.
S. G. GOODRICH.

69

70

BANISHMENT - EXILE.

BANISHMENT — EXILE.

-

1. Banish'd!—the damned use that word in hell; Howlings attend it; how, hast thou the heart To mangle me with that word-banishment?

2. Some natural tears they dropt, but wip'd them soon:
The world was all before them, where to choose
Their place of rest, and Providence their guide.
They hand in hand, with wand'ring steps and slow,
Through Eden took their solitary way.

SHAKSPEARE.

3. When I think of my own native land, In a moment 1 seem to be there; But alas! recollection at hand

Soon hurries me back to despair.

6.

MILTON'S Paradise Lost.

4. Ah me! how oft will fancy's spells, in slumber,
Recall my native country to my
mind;
How oft regret will bid me sadly number

Each lost delight, and dear friend left behind!

COWPER.

MAT. G. LEWIS.

5, Dreams of the land where all my wishes centre,
Those scenes which I am doom'd no more to know,
Full oft shall memory trace-my soul's tormentor-
And turn each pleasure past to present woe.

MAT. G. LEWIS.

I depart,

Whither I know not; but the hour's gone by,
When Albion's lessening shores could grieve or glad mine
eye.

BYRON'S Childe Harold.

7. Then fare thee well, my country, lov'd and lost! Too early lost, alas! when once so dear;

-BANNER-FLAG.

I turn in sorrow from thy glorious coast,
And urge the feet forbid to linger here.

8. Farewell! my more than fatherland!
Home of my heart and friends, adieu!
Ling'ring beside some foreign strand,
How oft shall I remember you!

3. As long as patriot valour's arm
Shall win the battle's prize,
That star shall beam triumphantly,
That Eagle seek the skies!

E. D. GRIFFIN.

BANNER-FLAG.

1. Who, forthwith, from the glitt'ring staff unfurl'd Th' imperial ensign, which, full high advanc'd, Shone like a meteor streaming to the wind.

MILTON'S Paradise Lost. 2. 'T is the Star-Spangled Banner-Oh, long may it wave O'er the land of the free, and the home of the brave!

F. KEY.

4. Flag of the free heart's only home, By angel hands to valour given, Thy stars have lit the welkin dome,

R. H. WILDE.

J. R. DRAKE.

And all thy hues were born in heaven! For ever float that standard sheet!

Where breathes the foe but falls before us, With Freedom's soil beneath our feet,

And Freedom's banner streaming o'er us!

J. R. DRAKE.

71

72

BASHFULNESS-BLUSH - MODESTY.

BASHFULNESS-PLUSH-MODESTY.

1. Unto the ground she cast her modest eye,
And, ever and anon, with rosy red,

The bashful blush her snowy cheeks did dye.
SPENSER'S Fairy Queen.

2. Maidens in modesty say No, to that

Which they would have the profferers construe, Aye.
SHAKSPEARE.

3. Confusion thrill'd me then, and secret joy,
Fast throbbing, stole its treasures from my heart,
And, mantling upward, turn'd my face to crimson.

4. From every blush that kindles in thy cheeks, Ten thousand little loves and graces spring, To revel in the roses

Rowe's Tamerlane.

5. As lamps burn silent with unconscious light,
So modest ease in beauty shines most bright;
Unaiming charms with rays resistless fall,
And she, who means no mischief, does it all.

BROOKE.

AARON HILL.

6. He saw her charming, but he saw not half The charms her downcast modesty conceal'd. THOMSON'S Seasons.

7. Do good by stealth, and blush to find it fame.

8. A crimson blush her beauteous face o'erspread,
Varying her cheeks, by turn, with white and red;
The driving colours, never at a stay,
Run here and there, and flush, and fade away.

POPE.

PARNELL.

9. The modest matron, and the blushing maid. GOLDSMITH'S Traveller.

BASHFULNESS - BLUSH - MODESTY.

10. The bashful virgin's sidelong look of love.

11. That modest grace subdu'd my soul,

That chastity of look which seems to hang,
A veil of purest light, o'er all her beauties,
And by forbidding most inflames desire.

12. I pity bashful men, who feel the pain

Of fancied scorn, and undeserv'd disdain,
And bear the marks upon a blushing face,
Of needless shame, and self-impos'd disgrace.

13. True modesty is a discerning grace,

And only blushes in the proper place;
But counterfeit is blind, and skulks thro' fear,
Where 't is a shame to be asham'd t' appear.

14. Playful blushes, that seem'd nought But luminous escapes of thought.

15. I know a cheek whose blushes,
As they trembling come and go,
I could gaze upon for ever,
If it did not pain thee so.

17.

16. And so the blush is form'd, and flies,
Nor owns reflection's calm control,
It comes, it deepens — fades, and dies,
A gush of feeling from the soul.

Modesty's the charm
That coldest hearts can quickest warm;
Which all our best affections gains,
And, gaining, ever still retains.

GOLDSMITH.

YOUNG.

CowPER.

CowPER.

T. MOORE.

MRS. OSGOOD.

MRS. DINNIES.

J. K. PAULDING.

73

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