Folk Lore and Genealogies of Uppermost Nithsdale

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R. G. Mann, 1904 - 267 pages

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Page 150 - My Dear, quo' he, ye're yet o'er young, And ha* na learn'd the Beggars Tongue, To follow me frae Town to Town, And carry the Gaberlunzie on. Wi...
Page 2 - ... master sometimes of a brew-house, whose entertainments, in my opinion, may easily be guest at, provided you reflect on our late accommodation. " There is also a market-place, such an one as it is, and a kind of a thing they call a tolbooth, which at first sight might be suspected a prison, because it is so like one ; whose decays by the law of antiquity are such, that every prisoner is threatened with death before his trial ; and every casement, because bound about with iron bars, discovers the...
Page 12 - A continual dropping in a very rainy day and a contentious woman are alike.
Page 150 - Wi' cauk and keel' I'll win your bread, And spindles and whorles for them wha need, Whilk is a gentle trade indeed, To carry the gaberlunzie on. I'll bow my leg, and crook my knee. And draw a black clout o'er my ee ; A cripple or blind they will ca' me, While we shall be merry and sing.
Page 16 - ... merchants going abroad to carry only as much as they strictly require for their travelling expenses. The Estates enacted, that ' nae person take upon hand to use ony manner of witchcrafts, sorcery, or necromancy, nor give themselves furth to have ony sic craft or knowledge thereof, there-through abusing the people;' also, that ' nae person seek ony help, response, or consultation at ony sic users or abusers of witchcrafts .... under the pain of death.
Page 16 - that ' nae person take upon hand to use any manner of witchcrafts, sorcery, or necromancy, nor give themselves furth to have ony sic craft or knowledge thereof therethrough abusing the people;' also, that 'nae person seek ony help, response, or consultation, at ony sic users or abusers of witchcrafts . . . under pain of death.
Page 154 - I have been young and now am old," saith the Psalmist, "yet never saw I the righteous forsaken nor his seed begging their bread.
Page 235 - ... MacGill'inan, son of Gillie Phinan, who was named after Saint Finan, in process of time corrupted to MacLennan. McNaught is also a Galloway surname, and has no connection with or relation to McNaughtan, which is purely a Gaelic name. The McNaughts of Kilquarity carried as their Arms, Sable, an escocheon chequy, argent and azure, between three lions' heads erased, of the second, langued, gules.

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