Annual Report, 20–22. köide

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Page 14 - For the king had at sea a navy of Tharshish with the navy of Hiram : once in three years came the navy of Tharshish, bringing gold, and silver, ivory, and apes, and peacocks.
Page 15 - And it came to pass at the end of forty days, that Noah opened the window of the ark which he had made: ~] And he sent forth a raven, which went forth to and fro, until the waters were dried up from off the earth.
Page 15 - ... but the dove found no rest for the sole of her foot, and she returned unto him into the ark, for the waters were on the face of the whole earth: then he put forth his hand, and took her, and pulled her in unto him into the ark.
Page 15 - And the dove came in to him in the evening; and, lo, in her mouth was an olive leaf pluckt off: so Noah knew that the waters were abated from off the earth.
Page 32 - But the poor dog, in life the firmest friend, The first to welcome, foremost to defend, Whose honest heart is still his master's own, Who labours, fights, lives, breathes for him alone...
Page 27 - ... green meadows of England in autumn, for the myrtle and orange groves of Italy, and for the palms of Africa : he has always objects of pursuit, and his success is secure. Even the beings selected for his prey are poetical, beautiful, and transient.
Page 23 - So the sweet lark, high poised in air, Shuts close his pinions to his breast, (If chance his mate's shrill call he hear,) And drops at once into her nest. The noblest captain in the British fleet Might envy William's lip those kisses sweet.
Page 27 - He is the joyous prophet of the year — the harbinger of the best season: he lives a life of enjoyment amongst the loveliest forms of nature : winter is unknown to him; and he leaves the green meadows of England in autumn, for the myrtle and orange groves of Italy, and for the palms of Africa: — he has always objects of pursuit, and his success is secure.
Page 56 - I have counted above 10,000,000), so subtile (they are scarcely visible to the naked eye, and often resemble thin smoke), so light (raised, perhaps, by evaporation into the atmosphere), and are dispersed in so many ways (by the attraction of the sun, by insects, wind, elasticity, adhesion, &c.), that it is difficult to conceive a place from which they can be excluded.
Page 54 - May at times, when the wild products of the field are nearly consumed, the ivy ripens its berries, and...

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