Darwinism and Human Life

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Holt, 1917 - 263 pages

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Page 69 - Nothing is easier than to admit in words the truth of the universal struggle for life, or more difficult at least I have found it so than constantly to bear this conclusion in mind. Yet unless it be thoroughly engrained in the mind, the whole economy of nature, with every fact on distribution, rarity, abundance, extinction, and variation, will be dimly seen or quite misunderstood.
Page 182 - I happened to read for amusement ' Malthus on Population, and being well prepared to appreciate the struggle for existence which everywhere goes on from long-continued observation of the habits of animals and plants, it at once struck me that under these circumstances favourable variations would tend to be preserved, and unfavourable ones to be destroyed. The result of this would be the formation of a new species. Here, then, I had at last got a theory by which to work...
Page 36 - Therefore, my success as a man of science, whatever this may have amounted to, has been determined, as far as I can judge, by complex and diversified mental qualities and conditions. Of these, the most important have been the love of science unbounded patience in long reflecting over any subject industry in observing and collecting facts and a fair share of invention as well as of common-sense. With such moderate abilities as I possess, it is truly surprising that I should have influenced...
Page 70 - Within himself, from more to more; Or, crown'd with attributes of woe Like glories, move his course, and show That life is not as idle ore, But iron dug from central gloom, And heated hot with burning fears, And dipt in baths of hissing tears, And batter'd with the shocks of doom To shape and use.
Page 238 - And the eye cannot say unto the hand, I have no need of thee : nor again the head to the feet, I have no need of you.
Page 58 - It may be doubted whether there are many other animals which have played so important a part in the history of the world, as have these lowly organized creatures.
Page 53 - Newman, who has long attended to the habits of humble-bees, believes that "more than two-thirds of them are thus destroyed all over England.
Page 11 - ... greatly alter (as indeed I have observed in parts of South America) the vegetation: this again would largely affect the insects ; and this, as we...
Page 34 - I had, also, during many years followed a golden rule, namely, that whenever a published fact, a new observation or thought came across me, which was opposed to my general results, to make a memorandum of it without fail and at once; for I had found by 69 experience that such facts and thoughts were far more apt to escape from the memory than favourable ones.
Page 142 - It must be clearly understood that there is nothing in these statements to invalidate the general doctrine that the children of a gifted pair are much more likely to be gifted than the children of a mediocre pair. They merely express the fact that the ablest of all the children of a few gifted pairs is not likely to be as gifted as the ablest of all the children of a very great many mediocre pairs

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