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passage from a Greek author in which either of the library at Vire is prefaced by a long bioAthens or Sparta is called an "eye of graphy of Pichon. Thirty years ago I made Greece." I note that in the Eumenides of several extracts from it, which I furnished to Mr. Æschylus (949, 950, Linwood) oupa yàp áons Edwards for his Memoirs of Libraries (vol. ii. Xovos Onondos does not mean Athens, but “the p. 335). It is not impossible that this life may flower of the whole land (or city) of Theseus,” | contain some reference to the promised memoirs. meaning, of course, the pick of the people there. The life of Pichon in the Biographie Générale,

C. M. I. from which B. T. quotes, although it cites as its Athenæum Club.

authority Seguin, Essai sur l'Histoire de Vire, is, I am grateful to the gentlemen who have come

like most of the less important lives in the book, to my assistance. Their kindness is by no means simply an abridgm

simply an abridgment of the article on the same lessened by the fact that another correspondent of person in the Biographie Universelle, which is the “N. & Q.'' sent me the same information privately. | best printed account of Pichon, though muck

rivatele best printed account of Pichon, though much less When I sent my query I was of opinion that Mr. full than the manuscript memoir before referred to. Swinburne's line

Rich. C. CHRISTIE.

Virginia Water. " Then the whole world's eye was Athens"bad its prototype in Æschylus. Now I have the ECCLESIASTICAL BALLADS (6th S. viii. 429, 542). best possible authority for knowing that line is an -Let me inform E. A. B. that the couplet he expansion of Milton, P. R., iv. 240, anent which gives is not quite correct. The collection he the best comment is Masson's note in loc. MR. inquires for is " Songs and Ballads for the People. E. MARSHALL's letter is valuable as particularizing By the Rev. John M. Neale, B.A., of Trinity Colthis vague reference found therein : "This image, lege, Cambridge. Published by James Burns, 17, Dunster goes on to say, is mentioned in Aristotle's Portman Street, 1814," The first in the collection Rhetoric."

is called Perhaps those who have so kindly taken up

The Church of England. this question may be able to answer another. “The good old Church of England ! Masson says: “Newton notes, 'Demosthenes With Her Priests through all the land, calls Athens somewhere the eye of Greece,

And Her twenty thousand Churches, 000aduos 'Eadódos, but I cannot at present

How nobly does She stand !

Dissenters are like mushrooms recollect the place.'......Dunster adds, 'I cannot

That flourish but a day; discover the passage referred to by Bp. Newton.'" Twelve hundred years, through smiles and tears

H. SCHERREN.

She hath lasted on alway.” 68. Lamb's Conduit Street.

There are four verses in this ballad. The collecTHE MEMOIRS or Thomas Picuon (6th S. viii.

tion contains sixteen songs and ballads. I cannot,

for the moment, place my hands on the other quo468).— The volume by Thomas Pichon, entitled

tation E. A. B. gives in reference to meeting houses. Lettres et Mémoires pour servir à l'Aistoire Naturelle, Civile, et Politique du Can. Breton | There is no prose article in this particular tract.

WM. VINCENT. jusqu'en 1758, was printed in 1760 in London,

Belle Vue Rise, Norwich. though with the rubric of La Haye. The volume does not, however, contain the “ mémoires” pro- Goose HOUSE (6th S. viii. 448). — Under this mised by the title, but only the letters. These expression Wright's Provincial Dictionary has :"mémoires ” have never been printed. Shortly

"A place of temporory confinement for petty before the publication of the volume, being dis- offenders, appended generally to a country house of gusted with the management of French colonial correction, or sessions house, for security until they can affairs, Pichon came to London, and passed the be carried before a magistrate. Of small dimensions remainder of his life there or in Jersey under the

generally: whence probably the name, which I rather

think is confined to East Anglia.'-Moor's Suffolk MS." name of Tyrrel. He formed a valuable library

F. C. BIRKBECK Terry. (though certainly not 30,000 volumes, as stated by M. Ravaisson in his Rapports sur les Bibliothèques DOUBLE CHRISTIAN NAMES (6th S. vii. 119. de l'Ouest), whicb, on his death in 1781, he be- 172 ; viii, 153, 273, 371).-In Muratori's Annali queathed to his native town of Vire; and though d'Italia, vol. ix. p. 314 (Lucca, 1763), is the his collections were much pillaged during the following: “Il piccolo duca di Savoia Carlo GioRevolution, many of his books having been de- vanni Amadeo in quest' anno (1496) mancò di stroyed and others appropriated by the library of vita." The Histoire de la Maison Royale de Caen, between two and three thousand of them France, par le P. Anselme (Paris, 1726), makes are still to be found in the public library of Urraque, natural daughter of Alphonso I. of PorVire. His manuscripts and papers were included tugal (b. 1110, d. 1185), marry Pierre Alfonse de in the bequest of his library, and ought still to be Viegas (vol. i. p. 575). In Venezia, one of the series found there. The excellent manuscript catalogue “Le Cento città d'Italia,” published at Milan, 1879, “ per cura del Prof. G. de Nino," Pietro progress of a sale, and that upon catching sight of Centranigo Barbolano is given as Doge of Venice the auctioneer she moved to him, illustrating her 1026-1032; but I find him elsewhere (Histoire statement by suiting the action to the word as she de Venise, par E. Sergent) mentioned as Pietro spoke to me, and showing me how she bowed to Centianigo, and the first indisputably doubly him. The auctioneer, misinterpreting the lady's named doge is Marc Antonio Trevisan, 1553–54. action, accepted the move as a bid, and knocked To descend to less illustrious individuals, on p. 52 down the lot he was then offering to her. of The Historie of Guicciardin, containing the

W. H. Husk. Warres of Italie and other Partes reduced into

A year ago, when I came first into Lincolnshire. English, by Geffray Fenton, imprinted at London, I was at once struck by this use of while; and I 1599, John Jacques Trinulce is described as “a

may say that in this neighbourhood it appears to captain valiaunt and particular in the profession

be the almost invariable custom to use the word in of honour" in 1495. Jean Gilles du Buat, Seigneur |

this sense. I once heard our old clerk reverse the de la Blandinière, was the son of Jean du Buat

order, and say “ until my son was alive," but that and Jeanne de Charpace, who were married “par is the only occasion. Is it not, however, probable contrat du 8 Août, 1442” (Nobilaire de Normandie, that the local phraseology is much the same on vol. i. part ii. p. 44). Jean François de la Mirandole

both sides of the Humber? I was much amused was the father of the great Jean Pic de la Miran. I the other day to come across the same use of while dole, who was born in 1463. Ross O'CONNELL

in Macbeth, III, i. 43:TAE OFFICIAL SEALS OF AMERICAN BISHOPS

“To make society

The sweeter welcome, we will keep ourself (6th S. vii. 481, 502).--There is an error which

Till supper time alone : while then, God be with you!" asks for correction in these lists. Among the dioceses having no seals I included “ Western

Your correspondent would scarcely conclude from New York," and among those having seals I placed

this passage that Macbeth and Shakspere were " Buffalo." Buffalo is the chief city of the diocese

Yorkshiremen! I have also heard move used here of “ Western New York,” but does not give the

for bow or take the hat off, but am told that it is name to the diocese, and there is, therefore, no

an expression confined to no special county in see of “Buffalo."

C. Moor, England. “ Western New York” was, however, as I regret to find, correctly classed; for

Grimsby. the seal described, though designed for that diocese,

THE GOSPEL FOR CHRISTMAS DAY AS A CHARM has never yet been actually cut or used as such.

1 (6th S. viii. 490).-I cannot see the connexion be

H. W. New University Club.

tween the quotation from Jacobus Sprenger and

the passage in Hamlet. The heading, moreover, LONDON COSTOMS BILL OF ENTRY (6th S. viii. to W. C. B.'s note does not appear in any way 447).- A list of goods imported and exported at applicable to its contents. In the lines addressed London, or, as it is termed, the “ London Customs by Marcellus to Hamlet, Shakespear alludes, of Bill of Entry," can be found in the old issues of course, to the monkish tradition that, on the night the Reading Mercury. A facsimile of the first before Christmas Day the great festival is anissue of this paper, dated July 8, 1723, is now nounced by the crowing of “the bird of dawning." being issued as a supplement to the present Read. It was commonly believed, too, in Elizabethan ing Mercury; the original is to be found in the times that the cattle knelt down at midnight on Bodleian Library, Oxford. Jno. H. BULLOCK. Christmas Eve. Both of these events may occa113, Abbey Street, S.E.

sionally have happened at that season, from

entirely natural causes. I have often at night AGxEW, McLEROTH, &c. (6th S. viii. 449). -- For

seen the cattle browsing on their knees, and it is promotions, or certainly implied promotions, I would

certainly not uncommon to hear chanticleer shoutsuggest referring to the old Army Lists (failing

ing during the hours of darkness. A classical any original MS. source). Many of these are pre

example will readily occur to all. It was at night served in the British Museum. I may also remark

that the cock crowed when Peter denied our that names such as McLeroth are very uncertain

Saviour. And I cannot refrain from mentioning as to initial letter, the above being varied to

the characteristic trait of human pature that in all McCleroth, McIlroth, Mcllwraith, McClewraith, &c.

M. G.

the four Gospels the story of Peter's disloyalty is Rose Villa, Burnham, Bucks.

told with graphic details, while events of greater

importance, such as the Last Supper, are overlooked WHILE=UNTIL : MOVE (6th S. iv. 489 ; vi. ! by one or more of the Evangelists. 55, 177, 319; vii. 58, 516; viii. 91, 278, 354, In a delightful book of travels which appeared 411).-A Cheshire lady some years ago told me two or three years ago allusion was made to a that she once, accompanied by a female relation, curious wave of unrest which, a few hours entered an auction room in Chester during the before dawn, seems to pass over all animal life.

*8.

I asked a question on the subject in Folk lore jumenta ") by referring to the English translation: Record for 1880, but my inquiry elicited no of Richard of Devizes in Bohn's Chronicles of the information. Two or three hours before sun-Crusaders, p. 50, sect. 81, edit. 1865. rise, sometimes even at midnight, the animal

FRED. C. Frost. world is aroused by some common instinct, which Teignmouth. paturalists have hitherto failed to explain. The small birds on the trees begin to sing, the sheep

Berlin HERALDIC EXHIBITION (6th S. vii. 229,

| 515).-In the Bibliographer for October, 1882, graze, the cattle, raising themselves on their hind

W. M. M. will find a note on the above exhibilegs, browse in a kneeling posture, and the cocks, crow lustily. In a few minutes it ceases, and all

bition, which will doubtless be of interest. is again at rest. Perhaps some of your contri

HIRONDELLE. butors can throw some light on this curious natural MoXLEY (6th S. viii. 469).-Among other pursephenomenon, which doubtless gave rise to the names and nicknames of Margaret we have Mogg legend alluded to by Shakespear in the lines and Moggie, hence Moxon (Mogg's son) and the quoted by W. C. B.

F. G. | local surname Moxley. R. S. CHARNOCK. THE NUMBER OF Ancestors (6th S. viii. 65,

Can W. give any old form of this name? It 115, 237).-Allow me to correct three slight errors

does not occur in Eyton's Staffordshire Domesday. in my note on this subject. I find that the Queen's

enis Kemble's Index, vol. vi. contains Moxesdūn. This great-granddaughter is called Féodore and not points to a personal name, Mox. A.-S. meox means Victoria ; the Grand Dake of Hesse is descended dung, from which comes provincial English mixen, four times from the House of Bavaria ; and Albert Germ. mist.

F. W. WEAVER. of Batavia (p. 239) should be of Bavaria. Since I penned my first pote I have examined the seize heard this expression used in Hampshire of two

Pigeon PAIR (6th S. viii. 385).-I have often quartiers of eighty living members of royal and children, a boy and girl, not twins, who have no princely families; not ong is descended from six-l brother or si

* brother or sister.

T. W. teen fainilies. The Archduke Leopold Ferdinand I

Ropley, Hants. is descended from only three families, ten times from that of Bourbon; his father, the ex-Grand |

I remember well when a boy that if on cracking Duke of Tuscany, from four; the Emperor of

neror of a nut we found two kernels inside instead of one Brazil, Henri de Bourbon, son of the Duke of l (which not unfrequently happened), we called the Parma, and the Duc d'Orléans, from five families out a pigeon nut, and the kernels a pigeon pair. each ; the Archduke Leopold Salvator from four

Robert M. THURGOOD. families. If King Alfonso's pedigree were above | Cross Passant (6th S. vii. 227).-W. M. M.'s suspicion, he would descend from only three query as to the meaning of “ cross passant,” as families, three-fourths of his presumed ancestors applied 6th S. vi. 82, has remained unanswered being Bourbons. In every instance the descent is nine months. I had hoped MR. EVERARD GREEN of five generations.

EDMUND M. BOYLE. I would have explained, as he used the term. I had Dr. Thomas GREY (6th S. viii. 419). — There is

thought a cross passant was said of a cross with a further error which K. L. M. bas omitted to

floriated ends placed obliquely on the shield as notice. Gray died on July 30, 1771, about an

carried in walking in procession ; and that when

it was so placed, and had rectangular ends, it hour before midnight, but Dodsley's Annual Register gives the date is being July 31.

represented the cross carried by our Lord, and was

called a cross versée; but in all the instances of G. F. R. B.

the arms of Clement XIII. I have seen the cross Cross on LOAVES (6th S. vii. 427; viii. 75, has rectangular ends, and is placed perpendicularly; 391, 502, 528).-I have frequently heard Kent so I also should be glad to know in what sense he and Sussex cottagers say, when they set the called this a “cross passant." R. H. BUSK. sponge," “ You must make a cross over it, or the dough will never rise."

R. H. Busk.

HURLY-BURLY (6th S. viii. 420, 505).-Here

are two more instances of the early use of the REGISTERS OF WELSH CHURCHES (6th S. viii. word:469).-— With regard to the latter part of this query, “And in this search made for him, the hurly-burly the Welsh and Saxons' laws are compared in the was such that a citizen of the towne of Douer was Rev. W. Barnes's Notes on Ancient Britain and | Blaine."-Grafton, 1569, vol. i. p. 181. the Britons, published in 1858 by J. Russell Smith,

“ The truth of this hurly burlye grewe hereof, as it was

, after well knowen."-Grafton, 1569, vol. ii. p. 1318. Soho Square.

B. F. SCARLETT.

As Grafton copied much from Hall, and Holinshed List or ENGLISH LOCALITIES (6th S. viii. 223, copied from both Grafton and Hall, it is not un. 379, 456).-ST. Swithin will find the passage likely that the word may be found both in Hall sought (“Exonia eodem farre reficit homines et and Holinshed. I have not time to spare to look

at present. That-ever the word should be con- Aryan people would involve researches corering the sidered rare " caps me a good un," as the “rascall whole field of Aryan pbilology. If Mr. Ferguson had people” say in these parts.

R. R.

been acquainted with the works of Fick, Heintza, and

other recent German writers upon his subject, lie would Boston, Lincolnshire.

bave been put in possession of principles which would CURE BY TOUCH (6th S. vii. 448; viii. 113, 292.

have enabled him to avoid serions crrors. The fanlt of

his book is that habit of quessing which the scientific -I am informed of another trait of M. Henrici, man abhors. Finding in a recent English directory the gentleman mentioned at the last reference as names that resem

mg that he encounters in claiming to be “ de la famille des guerisseurs," as Kemble's Codex Diplomaticus, or in the Liber Vilæ of he expresses it. Though a professed disciple of

Durbam, or even in the wide-covering Altdeutsches

| Namenbuch of Förstemann, he acgumes, withont suffi “ free thought," he is proud to claim descent from

cient evidence, their identity. He may be right in the family of St. Roch, the patron of the plague

| many cases, but the number of instances in which he is stricken, as well as from that of St. Louis, and one wrong will discredit much of what he advances. Take, of his relations is possessed of a staff believed to | for example, such names as Kennaway, alloway. Gallobe the traditional one used by the saint when he way, and other eimilar forms. These he would identify

with such ancient names as Kenewi. Alewib. Geilwih. went on his missions of healing the sick, and with

ignoring the fact that these appellations find a ready which mediæval art always depicts him.'

explanation in the corresponding names of places in R. H. Bosk. Scotland). This ignoring of place-names as the probable

explanation of many of our fam:l ar surnames is the THOMAS BAMBRIDGE (6th S. viii. 187, 316, 375).

0, 31: vice of the book. An examination of Slater's Directory -With reference to the latter part of G. F. R. B.'s of Scotland would have convinced Mr. Ferguson that query, Mr. John Nicholls, F.S.A., in his explana- such names as Alderdice, Dyce, Full Jove, Hannah, tions of the subjects of Hogarth's works, states:- Kinnaird, are not to be traced to the out-of-the-way “This very fine picture, Hogarth himself tells us, was

forms he adduces, but to localities in North Britain,

in the neighbourhood of which the families bearing painted in 1729 fur Sir Archibald Grant, of Monymusk, Bart., at that time Knight of the Shire for Aberdeen,

these names are still to be found. Perhaps, too, he

1, would not have said what he does about the termination and one of the Committee represented in the painting.”

| -stoff in some English surnames if he had thought of The engraving of this picture which I possess is the localities similarly denominated, and evidently the " by T. Cook from an original picture by W. source of some, if not of all of them, e.g., Bickerstaffe, Hogarth in the possession of Mr. Ray."

Wagataffe, &c. The same may be said of his Baldridge C. A. PYNE.

and Hardacre, and other compounds containing ridge or

-acre. This very numerous class has too many repre. Hampstead, N.W.

sentatives in local nomenclature to warrant the farAUTHORS OF QUOTATIONS Wanted (6th S. ix.

fetched origing put forward by Mr. Ferguson. This

tendency to ignore the easy explanation of surnames 10).

offered by the names of localities often leads Mr. Fer« reams are but interludes which fancy makes,” &c. guson to somewhat startling conclusione. From such Dryden's Tales from Chaucer, “ The Cock and the Fox; names as Godsoe and Vergoose he would

the or, tbe Tale of ihe Nun's Priest," I. 325. C. A. PYNE. existence of a High German element among the in

vaders of England. Godsoe seems to us to be a local

name (Gods-hoe), akin to the forms Godsbe and Godsiscellaneous.

croft, and the name Vergoose is most prohably Cornish,

and of the same kind as Engoose, Mellangoose, Tre. NOTES ON BOOKS, &c.

goose, Pencoole, Wildgoose, &c., all to be found in Surnames as a Science. By Robert Ferguson, M.P. Cornwall, in the first instance as names of places, and (Routledge & Sons.)

afterwards frequently as those of families. The termiWHEN one thinks of the large literature devoted nation goose is the Cornish form of the Welsh cord= on the Continent, and especially in Germany, to per wood, and cognate with English heath. If Mr. Fersonal and surnames, one is surprised tbat the subject has guson, in another edition of his book, would give excited so little interest on this side of the Channel, Mr. full credit to the place-name element, and at the Lower's and Mr. Bardsley's works are the only recent same time furnish from trustworthy sources intermediate English publications dealing with the matter, and, links between the early forms he brings forward and valuable as they are in many respects, they lack that those which he attempts to explain, his work would thoroughness and scientific method which distinguish be most valuable. As it is, we fear that its merits will be the researches in nomenclature of our German neighbours. overshadowed by its defecte. Perbaps these defects are Mr. Ferguson has availed himself of many continental the necessary attendants of such a pioneer movement ag authorities, and has also gone for information upon Anglo- | Mr. Ferguson has inaugurated in this country. At any Saxon names to the founts furnished by our early rate, they will meet with no harsh criticism from any charters. For these reasons his work is a great advance one who knows the nature of the labours undertaken by upon those of his predecessors. Yet it is too much to Mr. Ferguson and the great difficulties by which they claim for his researches the character of a science. are beset. Apart from the question wbether the word science is applicable to name-investigations in any other sense The Roxburghe Ballads, illustrating the Last Years of than that in wbich it is given to philology generally, we the Stuarts. Edited, with special Introduction and fear big method is far from sanctioning the ambition dig. Notes, by J. Woodfall Ebsworth, M.A., F.S.A. played in bis title. His inductions are far too narrow Part XIII. (Ballad Society.) to bear the issues he would force from them. A WITH the thirteenth number of the Roxburche Ballads scientifie study of the personal nomenclature of any | Mr. Ebsworth commences the fifth volume of this rapidly

I asked a question on the subject in Fulk lore jumenta ") by referring to the English translation: Record for 1880, but my inquiry elicited no of Richard of Devizes in Bohn's Chronicles of the information. Two or three hours before sun-Crusaders, p. 50, sect. 81, edit. 1865. rise, sometimes even at midnight, the animal

FRED. C. Frost. world is aroused by some common instinct, which Teignmouth. paturalists have hitherto failed to explain. The small birds on the trees begin to sing, the sheep

BERLIN HERALDIC EXHIBITION (6th S. vii. 229; graze, the cattle, raising themselves on their hind

| 515).-In the Bibliographer for October, 1882,

W. M. M. will find a note on the above exhibilegs, browse in a kneeling posture, and the cocks crow lustily. In a few minutes it ceases, and all

tion, which will doubtless be of interest.

HIRONDELLE, is again at rest. Perhaps some of your contributors can throw some light on this curious natural Moxley (6th S. viii. 469). ---Among other pursephenomenon, which doubtless gave rise to the names and nicknames of Margaret we have Mogg legend alluded to by Shakespear in the lines and Moggie, hence Moxon (Mogg's son) and the quoted by W. C. B.

F. G. local surname Moxley. R. S. CHARNOCK. THE NUMBER OF ANCESTORS (6th S. viii. 65, |

Can W. give any old form of this name? It 115, 237).- Allow me to correct three slight errors

does not occur in Eyton's Staffordshire Domesday. in niy note on this subject. I find that the Queen's Kemble's Index, vol. vi. contains Moxesdūn. This great-granddaughter is called Féodore and not points to a personal name, Mox.

| points to a personal name, Mox. A.-S. meox means Victoria : the Grand Dake of Hesse is descended dung, from which comes provincial English mizen, four times from the House of Bavaria : and Albert | Germ. inisi.

F. W. WEAVER. of Batavia (p. 239) should be of Bivaria. Since I

PIGEON PAIR (6th S. viii. 385).-I have often penned my first note I have examined the seize

heard this expression used in Hampshire of two quartiers of eighty living members of royal and

| children, a boy and girl, not twins, who have no princely families; not ong is descended from six: ong is descended from six: ! brother or sister.

T. W. teen finilies. The Archduke Leopold Ferdinand

Ropley, Hants. is descended from only three families, ten times from that of Bourbon; his father, the ex-Grand

I remember well when a boy that if on cracking Duke of Tuscany, from four: the Emperor of a nut we found two kernels inside instead of one Brazil, Henri de Bourbon, son of the Duke of l (which not unfrequently happened), we called the Parma, and the Duc d'Orléans, from five families but a pigeon nut, and the kernels a pigeon pair. each ; the Archduke Leopold Salvator from four

Robert M. TAURGOOD. families. If King Alfonso's pedigree were above | Cross Passant (6th S. vii. 227).-W. M. M.'s suspicion, he would descend from only three query as to the meaning of “cross passant," as families, three-fourths of his presumed ancestors applied 6th S. vi. 82, has remained unanswered being Bourbons. In every instance the descent is nine months. I had hoped Mr. Everard GREEN of five generations.

EDMUND M. BOYLE. would have explained, as he used the term. I had DR. THOMAS GREY (6th S. viii. 419).-There is

thought a cross passant was said of a cross with

floriated ends placed obliquely on the shield as a further error which K. L. M. bas omitted to notice. Gray died on July 30, 1771, about an

carried in walking in procession ; and that when

it was so placed, and had rectangular ends, it hour before midnight, but Dodsley's Annual

represented the cross carried by our Lord, and was Register gives the date its being July 31.

called a cross versée; but in all the instances of G. F. R. B.

the arms of Clement XIII. I have seen the cross Cross on LOAVES (6th S. vii. 427; viii. 75, has rectangular ends, and is placed perpendicularly; 391, 502, 528).—I have frequently heard Kent so I also should be glad to know in what sense he and Sussex cottagers say, when they “set the called this a" cross passant." R. H. BUSK. sponge," " You must make a cross over it, or the dough will never rise."

R. H. Busk.

HURLY-BURLY (6th S. viii. 420, 505).-Here

are two more instances of the early use of the REGISTERS OF WELSH CHURCHES (6th S. viii. word:469).- With regard to the latter part of this query, | “And in this search made for him, the hurly-burly the Welsh and Saxons' laws are compared in the was such that a citizen of the towne of Douer was Rev. W. Barnes's Notes on Ancient Britain and slaine."--Grafton, 1569, vol. i. p. 181. the Britons, published in 1858 by J. Russell Smith,

"The truth of this hurly burlye grewe hereof, as it was Soho Square.

B. F. SCARLETT.

after well knowen.”-Graflon, 1569, vol. ii. p. 1318.

• As Grafton copied much from Hall, and Holinshed LIST OF ENGLISH LOCALITIES (6th S. viii. 223, copied from both Grafton and Hall, it is not un. 379, 456).—Sr. SWITHIN will find the passage likely that the word may be found both in Hall sought (“Exonia eodem farre reficit homines et and Holinshed. I have not time to spare to look

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