The Plurality of Worlds ...

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Gould and Lincoln, 1854 - 307 pages
 

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Kasutaja arvustus  - Stevil2001 - LibraryThing

William Whewell was a mid-Victorian scientist-- arguably the Victorian scientist, as he's the one who coined the word in 1833, though it didn't catch on for several decades. Of the Plurality of Worlds ... Read full review

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Page 218 - Look how the floor of heaven Is thick inlaid with patines of bright gold. There's not the smallest orb which thou behold'st But in his motion like an angel sings, Still quiring to the young-eyed cherubims : Such harmony is in immortal souls ; But whilst this muddy vesture of decay Doth grossly close it in, we cannot hear it.
Page 226 - With half that kindling majesty dilate Thy strong conception, as when Brutus rose Refulgent from the stroke of Caesar's fate, Amid the crowd of patriots ; and his arm Aloft extending, like eternal Jove When guilt brings down the thunder, call'd aloud On Tully's name, and shook his crimson steel, And bade the father of his country hail ? For lo ! the tyrant prostrate on the dust, And Rome again is free...
Page 226 - Look then abroad through Nature, to the range Of planets, suns, and adamantine spheres, Wheeling unshaken through the void immense ; And speak, O man ! does this capacious scene With half that kindling majesty dilate Thy strong conception, as when Brutus rose Refulgent from the stroke of...
Page 68 - Far other life you live, far other tongue You talk, far other thought, perhaps, you think, Than man. How various are the works of God! But say, what thought?
Page 209 - Art. 44. of the Fixed Stars were also found to be barren flowers of the sky • objects, however beautiful, yet not sources of life or development, we need not think the powers of creation wasted or frustrated, thrown away or perverted. One such fertile result as the Earth, with all its hosts of plants and animals, and especially with Man, an intelligent being, to stand at the head of those hosts, is a worthy and sufficient produce, so far as we can judge of the Creator's ways by analogy, of all...
Page 261 - The marks of practical good sense, careful observation, and deep research are displayed in every page. An introductory essay of some seventy or eighty pages forms a valuable addition to the work. It comprises an abstract of the opinions advocated by the most eminent writers on the subject The statements are made with strict impartiality, and, without a comment, left to the judgment of the reader.
Page 116 - If the Earth as the habitation of man is a speck in the midst of an infinity of space, the Earth as the habitation of man is also a speck at the end of an infinity of time. If we are as nothing in the surrounding universe, we are as nothing in the elapsed eternity ; or rather in the elapsed organic antiquity during which the Earth has existed, and been the abode of life...
Page 164 - ... to your eyes, have a sphere of sensibility and intellectual enjoyment far superior to that of the inhabitants of your earth; each of those tubes which appears like the trunk of an elephant, is an organ of peculiar motion or sensation. They have many modes of perception of which you are wholly ignorant, at the same time that their sphere of vision is infinitely more extended than yours, and their organs of touch...
Page 232 - Him, if we may venture upon the expression ; — who can raise his intellect into some accordance with the Creative Intellect ; and that, not once only, nor by few steps, but through an indefinite gradation of discoveries, more and more comprehensive, more and more profound ; each, an advance, however slight, towards a Divine Insight ; — then, so far as intellect alone (and we are here speaking of intellect alone) can make Man a worthy object of all the vast magnificence of Creative Power, we can...
Page 114 - ... we discover : not the repetition of exactly similar cases, but a series of cases perpetually dissimilar, presents itself : not constancy, but change — perhaps advance ; not one permanent and pervading scheme, but preparation and completion of successive schemes : — not uniformity, and a fixed type of existences, but progression and a climax.

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