The American Naturalist, 12. köide

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Essex Institute, 1878
 

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Page 208 - Its discoverer describes these same two leaves as being present from the earliest condition of the plant, and assures me that they are in fact developed from the two cotyledons of the seed, and are persistent, being replaced by no others. From the circumference of the tabular mass, above, but close to the insertion of the leaves, spring stout, dichotomously branched cymes, nearly a foot high, bearing small erect scarlet cones, which eventually become oblong, and attain the size of those of the common...
Page 542 - THE MIDLAND NATURALIST. The Journal of the Associated Natural History, Philosophical, and Archaeological Societies and Field Clubs of the Midland Counties.
Page 202 - I MARVEL not, O Sun ! that unto thee In adoration man should bow the knee, And pour his prayers of mingled awe and love ; For like a God thou art, and on thy way Of glory sheddest with benignant ray, Beauty, and life, and joyance from above.
Page 367 - Die anthropologischen Sammlungen Deutschlands: ein Verzeichniss des in Deutschland vorhandenen anthropologischen Materials nach Beschluss der deutschen anthropologischen Gesellschaft zusammengestellt unter Leitung des Vorsitzenden der zu diesem Zwecke ernannten Commission.
Page 372 - Cope. PROF. MARSH ON PERMIAN REPTILES. — In the May number of the American Journal of Science and Arts, there is an appendix added by Prof. OC Marsh, in which he characterizes in a very insufficient manner, four species of reptiles, which he states to have been derived from a Permian formation in New Mexico. We should not regard this article as suitable for notice in this journal but for certain assertions which it contains, and some circumstances connected with its publication. In the opening...
Page 791 - It is to be lamented then, very much to be lamented, that we have suffered so many of the Indian tribes already to extinguish, without our having previously collected and deposited in the records of literature, the general rudiments at least of the languages they spoke.
Page 808 - Hitherto shall thou come, but no further: and here shall thy proud waves be stayed'?
Page 257 - The sailor had gone to bed, and about 10 o'clock he heard a noise resembling human cries, and as day-light, in these latitudes, never disappears at this season, he rose, and looked around, but on seeing no person, he returned to bed ; presently he heard the noise again, and rose a second time, but still saw nothing.
Page 93 - They are situated upon opposite sides of a small creek, and in ancient times are said to have been connected by a bridge. They are five and six stories high, each story receding from the one below it, and thus forming a structure terraced from top to bottom. Each story is divided into numerous little compartments, the outer tiers of rooms being lighted by small windows in the sides, while those in the interior of the building are dark, and are principally used as store-rooms.
Page 93 - Coleóptera and Orthoptera, especially in the higher regions. They made large collections of recent insects at different points along the railways from Pueblo to Cheyenne and from Cheyenne to Salt Lake, as well as at Lakin, Kans., Garland and Georgetown, Colo. and in various parts of the South Park and surrounding region. For want of time, they were obliged to forego an anticipated trip to White river, to explore the beds of fossil insects known to exist there.

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