The Method of Teaching and Studying the Belles Lettres: Or, an Introduction to Languages, Poetry, Rhetoric, History, Moral Philosophy, Physics, &c. ...

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For W. Otbridge, 1810

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Page 388 - Six days shalt thou labour, and do all that thou hast to do; but the seventh day is the Sabbath of the Lord thy God. In it thou shalt do no manner of work, thou, and thy son, and thy daughter, thy man-servant, and thy maid-servant, thy cattle, and the stranger that is within thy gates. For in six days the Lord made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that in them is, and rested...
Page 404 - And he cried and said, Father Abraham, have mercy on me and send Lazarus, that he may dip the tip of his finger in water and cool my tongue; for I am tormented in this flame.
Page 389 - See, for that the LORD hath given you the sabbath, therefore he giveth you on the sixth day the bread of two days ; abide ye every man in his place, let no man go out of his place on the seventh day.
Page 447 - QUINTILIAN says, [A] that he has included almost all the duty of scholars in this one piece of advice, which he gives them, to love those who teach them as they love the sciences which they learn of...
Page 447 - ... and to look upon them as fathers, from whom they derive not the life of the body, but that instruction which is in a manner the life of the soul.
Page 447 - The one can do nothing without the other; and as it is not sufficient for a labourer to sow the seed, unless the earth, after having opened its bosom to receive it...
Page 322 - Masters should have in View, is not barely to teach their Scholars Greek and Latin, to learn them to make Exercises and Verses, to charge their Memory with Facts and historical Dates, to draw up Syllogisms in Form, or to trace Lines and Figures upon Paper. These...
Page 333 - ... made use of by those who are entrusted with the education of youth. But this remedy becomes often a more dangerous evil than those they would cure, if employed out of season or beyond measure. For besides that the corrections of the rod and the lash we are now speaking of, have something unbecoming, mean, and servile in them, they have nothing in themselves to remedy any fault committed, nor is it likely that such a correction may become useful to a child, if the shame of suffering for having...
Page 449 - Quintillian sets upon the talents of the mind, he esteems those of the heart far beyond them, and looks upon the others as of no value without them. In the same chapter...

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