A Study: With Critical and Explanatory Notes, of Lord Tennyson's Poem, The Princess

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Dawson Brothers, 1884 - 120 pages

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Page 67 - The princess thought, that of all sublunary things knowledge was the best: she desired first to learn all sciences, and then proposed to found a college of learned women, in which she would preside, that, by conversing with the old, and educating the young, she might divide her time between the acquisition and communication of wisdom, and raise up for the next age models of prudence, and patterns of piety.
Page 115 - That like a broken purpose waste in air : So waste not thou ; but come; for all the vales Await thee ; azure pillars of the hearth Arise to thee; the children call, and I Thy shepherd pipe, and sweet is every sound, Sweeter thy voice, but every sound is sweet; Myriads of rivulets hurrying thro' the lawn, The moan of doves in immemorial elms, And murmuring of innumerable bees.
Page 94 - Unspeakable for sadness. By and by The ruddy square of comfortable light, Far-blazing from the rear of Philip's house, Allured him, as the beacon-blaze allures The bird of passage, till he madly strikes Against it, and beats out his weary life.
Page 80 - We — are we not formed, as notes of music are, For one another, though dissimilar? Such difference without discord as can make Those sweetest sounds in which all spirits shake, As trembling leaves in a continuous air.
Page 53 - Yet was there one thro" whom I loved her, one Not learned, save in gracious household ways. Not perfect, nay, but full of tender wants, !No Angel, but a dearer being, all dipt In Angel instincts, breathing Paradise...
Page 87 - That such a close, to have force, must be sonorous and susceptible of protracted emphasis, admitted no doubt : and these considerations inevitably led me to the long o as the most sonorous vowel, in connection with r as the most producible consonant.
Page 95 - Thy voice is heard thro' rolling drums, That beat to battle where he stands ; Thy face across his fancy comes, And gives the battle to his hands : A moment, while the trumpets blow, He sees his brood about thy knee ; The next, like fire he meets the foe, And strikes him dead for thine and thee. So Lilia sang : we thought her halfpossess'd, She struck such warbling fury thro...
Page 52 - Within her — let her make herself her own To give or keep, to live and learn and be All that not harms distinctive womanhood.
Page 53 - Happy he With such a mother ! faith in womankind Beats with his blood, and trust in all things high Comes easy to him, and tho' he trip and fall He shall not blind his soul with clay.
Page 83 - I could think he was one of those who would break their jests on the dead, And mangle the living dog that had loved him and fawn'd at his knee — Drench'd with the hellish oorali — that ever such things should be...

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