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" ... become extinct ; which will also be the fate of those which do not leave the feeding area at the proper time. Now, if we suppose that the two areas were (for some remote ancestor of the existing species) coincident, but by geological and climatic... "
A Dictionary of Birds - Page 548
by Alfred Newton - 1893 - 1212 lehte
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The popular encyclopedia; or, 'Conversations Lexicon': [ed. by A. Whitelaw ...

Popular encyclopedia - 1877
...the fate of those which do not leave the feedingarea at the proper time. Now if we suppose that the 1 two areas were (for some remote ancestor of the existing...hereditary, and so fixed as to be what we term an instinct' (Nature, vol. xp 459). Mr. Wallace further says, that every gradation must exist — and would be demonstrated...
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Bulletin of the Nuttall Ornithological Club, 5. köide

Nuttall Ornithological Club - 1880
...Bluebird. The gist of the whole matter, however, lies in the following. "Now," says Mr. Wallace, " if we suppose that the two areas were (for some remote...hereditary, and so fixed as to be what we term an instinct." In reference to this point, let us revert for a moment to the geological history of North America....
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Mental Evolution in Animals: With a Posthumous Essay on Instinct by Charles ...

George John Romanes - 1883 - 411 lehte
...other, we can easily understand how the habit of incipient and partial migration at the proper season would at last become hereditary, and so fixed as to be what we term an instinct. It will probably l)e found that every gradation still exists in various parts of the world, from a complete coincidence...
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The popular encyclopedia; or, 'Conversations Lexicon': [ed. by A. Whitelaw ...

Popular encyclopedia - 1884
...ultimately become extinct, which will also be the fate of those which do not leave the feedingarea at the proper time. Now if we suppose that the two...hereditary, and so fixed as to be what we term an instinct' (Nature, vol. xp 459). Mr. Wallace further says, that every gradation must exist — and would be demonstrated...
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The national encyclop¿dia. Libr. ed, 9. köide

National cyclopaedia - 1884
...other, we can easily understand how the habit of incipient and partial migration at the proper season would at last become hereditary, and so fixed as to...coincidence to a complete separation of the breeding and subsistence areas." Mr. Darwin's theory, though independently arrived at, is substantially the same....
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Habit and Instinct

Conwy Lloyd Morgan - 1896 - 351 lehte
...proper season will suffer, and ultimately become extinct, which will also be the fate of those who do not leave the feeding area at the proper time....probably be found that every gradation still exists in many parts of the world, from a complete coincidence to a complete separation of the breeding and the...
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Habit and Instinct

Conwy Lloyd Morgan - 1896 - 351 lehte
...proper season will suffer, and ultimately become extinct, which will also be the fate of those who do not leave the feeding area at the proper time....instinct. It will probably be found that every gradation Btill exists in many parts of the world, from a complete coincidence to a complete separation of the...
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The Foundations of Zoölogy

William Keith Brooks - 1899 - 339 lehte
...partial migration at the proper season would at last become hereditary, and so firmly fixed as to become what we term an instinct. It will probably be found...coincidence to a complete separation of the breeding and subsistence areas, and when the natural history of a sufficient number of species is thoroughly worked...
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Popular Science Monthly, 60. köide

1902
...ancestor of the existing species) coincident, but by geological and climatic changes gradually diverted from each other, we can easily understand how the...what we term an instinct." It will probably be found, however, if anything like a satisfactory explanation can be arrived at, that this habit or instinct...
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Bulletin of the Wisconsin Natural History Society, 1–2. köide

Wisconsin Natural History Society - 1900
...diverged from each other, we can easily understand how the habit of incipient and partial migrations at the proper seasons would at last become hereditary and so fixed as to be what is called an 13. Nature, vol. 10, p. 415. 14. Am. Jour. Science, 1866; p. 178 et seq. 15. Nature, vol....
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