The Makers of Modern English: A Popular Handbook to the Greater Poets of the Century

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Thomas Whittaker, 1890 - 375 pages

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Page 306 - The year's at the spring And day's at the morn; Morning's at seven; The hill-side's dew-pearled; The lark's on the wing; The snail's on the thorn: God's in his heaven All's right with the world!
Page 134 - In our halls is hung Armoury of the invincible knights of old : We must be free or die, who speak the tongue That Shakespeare spake ; the faith and morals hold Which Milton held.
Page 95 - How exquisitely the individual Mind (And the progressive powers perhaps no less Of the whole species) to the external World Is fitted : and how exquisitely, too Theme this but little heard of among men The external World is fitted to the Mind ; And the creation (by no lower name Can it be called) which they with blended might Accomplish : this is our high argument.
Page 302 - The very God! think, Abib; dost thou think? So, the All-Great, were the All-Loving too So, through the thunder comes a human voice Saying, "O heart I made, a heart beats here! "Face, my hands fashioned, see it in myself! "Thou hast no power nor mayst conceive of mine, "But love I gave thee, with myself to love, "And thou must love me who have died for thee!
Page 118 - It is a beauteous evening, calm and free, The holy time is quiet as a Nun Breathless with adoration; the broad sun Is sinking down in its tranquillity; The gentleness of heaven broods o'er the Sea: Listen!
Page 47 - He has outsoared the shadow of our night; Envy and calumny and hate and pain, And that unrest which men miscall delight, Can touch him not and torture not again; From the contagion of the world's slow stain He is secure, and now can never mourn A heart grown cold, a head grown gray in vain; Nor, when the spirit's self has ceased to burn, With sparkless ashes load an unlamented urn.
Page 94 - Paradise, and groves Elysian, fortunate fields like those of old Sought in the Atlantic main why should they be A history only of departed things, Or a mere fiction of what never was? For the discerning intellect of man, When wedded to this goodly universe In love and holy passion, shall find these A simple produce of the common day.
Page 284 - All we have willed or hoped or dreamed of good shall exist ; Not its semblance but itself; no beauty, nor good nor power Whose voice has gone forth, but each survives for the melodist When eternity affirms the conception of an hour.
Page 95 - I, long before the blissful hour arrives, Would chant, in lonely peace, the spousal verse Of this great consummation and, by words Which speak of nothing more than what we are, Would I arouse the sensual from their sleep Of Death, and win the vacant and the vain To noble raptures...
Page 135 - Whose powers shed round him in the common strife, Or mild concerns of ordinary life, A constant influence, a peculiar grace; But who, if he be called upon to face Some awful moment to which Heaven has joined Great issues, good or bad for human kind, Is happy as a Lover; and attired With sudden brightness, like a Man inspired...

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