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JOURNAL OF SCIENCE.

EDITED BY

JAMES SAMUELSON

AND

WILLIAM CROOKES, F.R.S.

VOLUME I.

With Illustrations on Copper, Wood, and Stone.

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LONDON: PRINTED BY W. CLOWES AND SONS, STAMFORD STREET,

AND CHARING CROSS

PAGE

REVIEWS

The Birds of India

176

1. The Birds of India :' being a Natural History of all the Birds known to

inhabit Continental India; with Description of the Species, Genera,

Families, Tribes and Orders, and a Brief Notice of such Families as

are not found in India; making it a Manual of Ornithology specially

adapted for India. By T. C. Jerdon, Surgeon-Major, &c. Calcutta,

1862. Vols. I. and Il. pt. l.

2. “Illustrations of Indian Ornithology. By T. C. Jerdon. Madras,

1844. 1 vol. 4to.

Natural History on the Amazons

181

1. “The Naturalist on the River Amazons.' By Henry Walter Bates, 2 vols.

8vo. London: John Murray, 1863.

2. ' Contributions to an Insect Fauna of the Amazon Valley; Lepidoptera,

Heliconidæ.' By Henry Walter Bates. (“Linnæan Transactions,

vol. xxiii. part 3, page 495.)

The Great Meteor of 1863. With a Woodcut

190

• Die grosse Feuerkugel, welche am Abende des 4 März, 1863, in Holland,

Deutschland, Belgien, und England gesehen worden ist.' Von Dr. Ed.

Heis, Professor der Mathematik und Astronomie an der Königl.

Akademie zu Munster. Halle: H. W. Schmidt. 1863.

(The Great Fireball which was seen on the evening of the 4th March, 1863,

in Holland, Germany, Belgium and England. By Dr. Ed. Heis of

Halle. H. W. Schmidt. 1863.)

Mills and Millwork

194

LL

2 vols.

Longmans.

Local Floras

200

1. “Flora of Surrey; or, a Catalogue of the Flowering Plants and Trees

found in the County.' By James Alexander Brewer. London: J.

Van Voorst.

2. 'Flora of Marlborough; with Notices of the Birds and a Sketch of the

Geological Features of the Neighbourhood.' London: J. Van Voorst.

THE QUARTERLY

JOURNAL OF SCIENCE.

JANUARY, 1864.

INTRODUCTION.

Tue readers of a new Periodical are fairly entitled to receive at the hands of its projectors, not only a statement of the grounds upon which it has been established, but also some exposition of its intended scope and objects.

The word "some" is here designedly used, for it is not improbable that a work of this description, professing to keep pace with the advancing intelligence of mankind, and even, should opportunities present themselves, to serve as a pioneer of progress, may in the course of time become so modified as materially to change its character. And as we are fortunately not trammelled by those conditions which in the commercial world frequently place limits upon a project when it is first set on foot, we shall reserve to ourselves the right of introducing amendments, or of supplying deficiencies as our work proceeds, adopting the old proverb that “ Times change, and with them we shall change also.” As this may appear a somewhat vague announcement of our plans, we will shortly conduct our readers to a standpoint from whence they may obtain a survey of the field of our intended labours, and in the meantime we would invite them to follow us in a few reflections which have been the cause of our venturing, at this particular period, into the ranks of literature.

How does it happen that from the earliest ages of the historic record, Art has been a favoured offspring of the human intellect, the spoiled child of man, whilst to Science he has been but a sorry stepfather ? In his rudest stages, he wooed her favour, painting his own skin if he could paint nought else, and in the palmy days of his early civilization he raised her upon a pedestal from which she never descended, although in the dark ages that followed, her figure was for the time obscured. Not so with Science. Her youthful steps have always been watched with jealousy and suspicion, and instead of guidance and support, every obstacle has been thrown in her path, her grandest revelations being

VOL. I.

B

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