Curiosities of Literature, 2. köide

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Page 188 - I behold like a Spanish great galleon and an English man-of-war. Master Coleridge, like the former, was built far higher in learning, solid, but slow in his performances. CVL, with the English man-of-war, lesser in bulk, but lighter in sailing, could turn with all tides, tack about, and take advantage of all winds, by the quickness of his wit and invention.
Page 55 - at the Mount of St Mary's, in the stony stage where I now stand, I have brought you some fine biscuits, baked in the oven of charity, carefully conserved for the chickens of the church, the sparrows of the spirit, and the sweet swallows of salvation.
Page 192 - But when they hear thee sing The glories of thy king, His zeal to God, and his just awe o'er men : They may, blood-shaken then, Feel such a flesh-quake to possess their powers, As they shall cry : ' Like ours \ In sound of peace or wars, No harp e'er hit the stars, In tuning forth the acts of his sweet reign, And raising Charles his chariot 'bove his Wain.
Page 121 - I could be content that we might procreate like trees, without conjunction, or that there were any way to perpetuate the world without this trivial and vulgar way of coition ; it is the foolishest act a wise man commits in all his life, nor is there any thing that will more deject his cooled imagination, when he shall consider what an odd and unworthy piece of folly he hath committed.
Page 48 - None from henceforth shall use to multiply gold or silver, or use the craft of multiplication; and if any the same do, he shall incur the pain of felony.
Page 259 - Tho' still some traces of our rustic vein 270 And splay-foot verse remain'd, and will remain. Late, very late, correctness grew our care, When the tir'd nation breath'd from civil war. Exact Racine, and Corneille's noble fire, Show'd us that France had something to admire.
Page 175 - A dungeon horrible on all sides round As one great furnace flamed; yet from those flames No light; but rather darkness visible Served only to discover sights of woe...
Page 279 - The bookful blockhead, ignorantly read, With loads of learned lumber in his head, With his own tongue still edifies his ears, And always list'ning to himself appears.
Page 190 - Twere simple fury, still, thyself to waste On such as have no taste; To offer them a surfeit of pure bread, Whose appetites are dead! No, give them...
Page 314 - For God's sake, when shall I see thee again ? On my soul I shall neither eat nor sleep until you come again.

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