The Poetical Works, 31. köide

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Bell & Daldy, 1866 - 185 pages

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Page 73 - Sees by degrees a purer blush arise, And keener lightnings quicken in her eyes. The busy sylphs surround their darling care, These set the head, and those divide the hair, Some fold the sleeve, whilst others plait the gown ; And Betty's prais'd for labours not her own. CANTO II. NOT with more glories, in th...
Page 108 - Thus artists melt the sullen ore of lead, With heaping coals of fire upon its head ; In the kind warmth the metal learns to glow, And loose from dross the silver runs below.
Page 100 - FAR in a wild, unknown to public view, From youth to age a reverend hermit grew ; The moss his bed, the cave .his humble cell, His food the fruits, his drink the crystal well: Remote from man, with God he pass'd the days, Prayer all his business, all his pleasure praise.
Page 93 - ... breathe The lake is smooth and clear beneath, Where once again the spangled show Descends to meet our eyes below. The grounds which on the right aspire, In dimness from the view retire : The left presents a place of graves, Whose wall the silent water laves. That steeple guides thy doubtful sight Among the livid gleams of night. There pass, with melancholy state. By all the solemn heaps of fate, And think, as softly-sad you tread Above the venerable dead, ' Time was, like thee they life possest,...
Page 61 - To clear this doubt, to know the world by sight, To find if books, or swains, report it right, (For yet by swains alone the world he knew, Whose feet came wandering o'er the nightly dew...
Page 98 - Go rule thy will, Bid thy wild passions all be still, Know God — and bring thy heart to know The joys which from religion flow : Then every Grace shall prove its guest, And I'll be there to crown the rest.
Page 32 - Thus some are born, my son,' she cries, ' With base impediments to rise, And some are born with none. ' But virtue can itself advance To what the favourite fools of chance By fortune seem'd design'd ; Virtue can gain the odds of fate, And from itself shake off the weight Upon th
Page 105 - Without a vain, without a grudging heart, To him who gives us all, I yield a part; From him you come, from him accept it here, A frank and sober, more than costly cheer.
Page 72 - And decks the goddess with the glitt'ring spoil. This casket India's glowing gems unlocks, And all Arabia breathes from yonder box.
Page 72 - Now awful beauty puts on all its arms ; The fair each moment rises in her charms, Repairs her smiles, awakens every grace. And calls forth all the wonders of her face ; Sees by degrees a purer blush arise, And keener lightnings quicken in her eyes.

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