Theology in the English Poets: Cowper, Coleridge, Wordsworth and Burns

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C. Kegan Paul, 1880 - 339 pages
 

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Page 290 - For a' that, and a' that, Our toils obscure and a' that ; The rank is but the guinea stamp, The man's the gowd for a
Page 126 - I have seen A curious child, who dwelt upon a tract Of inland ground, applying to his ear The convolutions of a smooth-lipped shell ; To which, in silence hushed, his very soul Listened intensely ; and his countenance soon Brightened with joy ; for from within were heard Murmurings, whereby the monitor expressed Mysterious union with its native sea. Even such a shell the universe itself Is to the ear of Faith...
Page 98 - Three years she grew in sun and shower, Then Nature said, 'A lovelier flower On earth was never sown ; This child I to myself will take; She shall be mine, and I will make A lady of my own. 'Myself will to my darling be " Both law and impulse : and with me The girl, in rock and plain, In earth and heaven, in glade and bower, Shall feel an overseeing power To kindle or restrain...
Page 25 - Memoriam." (Dedicated by Permission to the Poet-Laureate.) Fcap. 8vo, 2s. The Education of the Human Race. Translated from the German of Gotthold Ephraim Lessing. Fcap. 8vo, 2s.
Page 84 - Yet like some sweet beguiling melody, So sweet we know not we are listening to it, Thou the meanwhile wast blending with my thought, Yea with my life, and life's own secret joy ; Till the dilating soul, enrapt, transfused, Into the mighty vision passing — there As in her natural form swelled vast to Heaven ! Awake my soul ! not only passive praise Thou owest ! not alone these swelling tears, Mute thanks and secret ecstasy.
Page 104 - Unutterable love. Sound needed none, Nor any voice of joy ; his spirit drank The spectacle: sensation, soul, and form, All melted into him; they swallowed up His animal being ; in them did he live, And by them did he live; they were his life. In such access of mind, in such high hour Of visitation from the living God, Thought was not ; in enjoyment it expired.
Page 89 - The upper air burst into life ! And a hundred fire-flags sheen, To and fro they were hurried about ! And to and fro, and in and out, The wan stars danced between. And the coming wind did roar more loud, And the sails did sigh like sedge ; And the rain poured down from one black cloud ; The Moon was at its edge.
Page 76 - For not to think of what I needs must feel, But to be still and patient, all I can; And haply by abstruse research to steal From my own nature all the natural man — This was my sole resource, my only plan: Till that which suits a part infects the whole, And now is almost grown the habit of my soul.
Page 88 - The moving Moon went up the sky, And no where did abide: Softly she was going up, And a star or two beside — Her beams bemocked the sultry main, Like April hoar-frost spread; But where the ship's huge shadow lay, The charmed water burnt alway A still and awful red.
Page 260 - By sheddings from the pinal umbrage tinged Perennially — beneath whose sable roof Of boughs, as if for festal purpose, decked With unrejoicing berries, ghostly Shapes May meet at noontide; FEAR and trembling HOPE, SILENCE and FORESIGHT; DEATH, the Skeleton, And TIME, the Shadow; there to celebrate, As in a natural temple scattered o'er With altars undisturbed of mossy stone, United worship; or in mute repose To lie, and listen to the mountain flood Murmuring from Glaramara's inmost caves.

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