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vi

A TABLE

History of our national debts and Memoirs of the sufferings, &c.

taxes, from 1688 to 1752, 314

of a noble foreigner 77

ecclefiaftical, remarks

of miís MP, a

on vol. II.

430

celebrated English toatt 146

of Jack Connor 447

of the present age. By

Houshold furniture, a modern M. du Clos

443

dissertation on

a necessary

of Nell Gwin

396 Method to prevent the many
Hudibras, critical, historical, and robberies and villanies in and

explanatory notes on. : By about the city of London 76

Zachary Grey, L.L.D. 235 Methods for stopping the flagrant
Hume, David, on morals

crimes of murder, robbery,

political discourses

19

and perjury

234

concluded

Middleton, the two questions pre.

1.

vious to his free enquiry im-

Mportance of gaining and pre- partially considered. By dr.

serving the friendship of the Sykes

326

Indians

150 Noidnight contemplation in the

Inspector, letters from, to a country

397

lady, with the genuine an- ' Militia, a treatise concerning go

swers

145

and a Itanding army,

Jones, mrs. her miscellanies 213

thoughts upon

95

concluded 470 Mines, a compleat treatise of

1 Jurymen of London, an address

395

394 Miscellaneous tracts by the late

L.

dr. Conyers Middleton

353

Errer to the author of con. Monsanto's tour- thro'. England,

siderations on several

pro- Holland, &c.

76

posals relating to the poor 80 Moody on' ALEIM and Berit

third, to the author of

484

the enthusiasm of the metho. Morals, an enquiry concerning

dists and papists compared ib. che principles of. By David

to the lord bishop of

Hume, esq;

Clogher

154 Muficol expreffion, an effay on.

concerning the disco- By Charles Avison, organist

very of Herculaneum, and the in Newcastle

346

antiquities found there 235

N.

Eceflity of a

Libitina fine confli&tu

Libels, doctrine of ib. watch

234

Life of Patty Saunders 77 Nemo's imitation of Horace, b.ii.

Literati, the present fate of 316

311

Lor-life

394 Nervous fluid, or animal spirits

M.

demonstrated

An more than a machine Nettleton on virtue and happi.

313

ness

69

Man-midwifery, a vindication Newcombas consummation. Á

of

sacred ode

136

Moson, mr. his Elfrida, on the Nočuary ; or, address to the

model of the Greek tragedy tombs

155

387 North, mr. George, remarks on

May, description of. By bishop some conjectures relative to

Douglas

'263 an ancient piece of money

&c.

398

Nagent's

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forting Remarks on

Leeles. Hisho 430.

Nugent's translation of Burla. Prejudice detected. An ethic e-

maqui's principles of politic piftle

238

law

268 Proceedings at the court of Apollo

?

N. R.'s account of himself

317

483 Putrefirelior, experiments on,

0.

*Bý dr. Pringle

43

Bservations on the English

- continued IOI
language 149. Pythagoras. An ode

317,
on the second vision of

of St. John

206 Ua kade. À mock-herois

Odurum, Antonii Alfopi, libri

poem

157

doo

350

R:

Old lady and her niece detected Ambler

232 Receipts in phyfic 484

Oratle. A comedy. By mrs. Reflexions on the expediency of

Cibber

239

a law for the naturalization

Orario Harveiana, &c. 318 of foreign protettants 265

P.

Regis's discourse upon the inter-

Arricide, the

396

mediate state between the

deach of men and the resur-
cal observations on the ana- rection of their bodies, &c.
logy, between animal and ve.

240
getable propagation 367 Remarks on the life and writings:

Peeping Tom, to the counter: of of dr. John Hills 310

Coventry

239

on mr. Hume's essay on

Penelope to Ulyles, from Ovid miracles

313

314

on Raphael's designs

Penrose, Francis, his treatise on

147

electricity, &c.

438

on a treacise, entitled,

Peronet's remarks on the enthu. Free and candid disquisitions

halm of the methodists and reating to the church of

papitts compared 80 England, &c.

62

Perfius's fatires, translated by on letters concerning

Edmund Burton, efq;

mind

312

Philocatholicus's defence of dr.

on the sentence in fa.
Foßer's sermon on catholic vour of of M. and T.
communion

153 on Elfrida 482

Philofophical transactions 43,101 Rembrandt, catalogue of his et-

Pillars of priestcraft and ortho- chings

311

doxy fhaken

159' Review of the fiery eruption,

Poems by ****

211 cwhich defcated the emperor

Poetical impertinence; or, ad- Julian's attempt to rebuild

vice unaked..

the temple of Jerufalem 56

picces. By several hands. Rivals, the friendly: or, love

397

the beft contriver,

Political discourses. By David Rover: or happiness at last. A

Hume, esg;

19

paftoral drama : 316

Polity, principles of. By T.

S.

Pownal, esg;

435 Aunders, Patry, life of 77

Poor lagts, defects of. By I ho- Saxe, coant, secret memoirs

mas Alcock, M. A.

of

75

Portuguese, history of 196,241 Sayer's Latin translation of Pope's
Power, address to those in 396 essay on man

437
Pownal, T. esg; his principles

Sentence

435

235

232

238

396

96

of polity

146

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123

90

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V.

Sentence of the lieutenant-crimi.

T. nal at Paris

Acitus, observations on. Sequel to the essay on {pirit, with By the rev. I. Hunter

441 fome observations on the A. Tafle. A comedy. By mr. Foose thanafian and Nicone creeds

77 327 Teeth, a treatise on

321 Serious thoughts in regard to the Terence, comedies of, tranflated. public dilorders, &c

150
By mr. Gordon

311 Sermons, fingle, a catalogue of Tbeodorus, a dialogue concern

319, feq.

ing the art of preaching. By Eorvants, a proposal for their pır. Fordyce, late professor of

ainendment and encourage. philosophy in Aberdeca 416 ment

396 Tbeory of the moon made perShakespear's beauties felected

fect
316 Tolver on the teeth..

321 in Elyfium, a poeti- Tour through England, Holland, cal epiltle from, co mr. Gar. &c. By Antonio Morfanto 76 rick

397 Treatise concerning the melitia S.xiall pox, dr. Alam Ibompson's discourse on

307 Tucker's reflections on the expedr. T. Thompson's discourse diency of a law for the natu.

484

ralization of foreign proteSmallet, dr. his essay on the ex

ftants

265 ternal use of water, &c. 400

Alet, adventures of 155

149 Spi it. See Sequel to

Virtue and happiness, a treatise Stroud's genuine memoirs 145

By dr. Nettletox

69 Sternt's charge to the clergy of the the eaft. Arburtonmr.

York ments relating to the

fiery eruption which defeated Subidy treaties, new ballad on, the emperor Julian's attempt

155

to rebuild the temple in je. Sugar, an estay on the virtues ruf.dem, confidered

312 of

236 Warfon's history of Gods, &c. the art of making of 235

482 Supplement to lord Anson's voyage Welez's predelination calmly round the world

233
considered

312 to the memoirs of Bran.. Whyri's essay on the vital and denburg

312 other involuntary motions of Seppuration, a differtation on 157 apimals Surgery, the state of 399 Wortelly compliances 146 Survegar, qualifications and du. Winstanly's new form of felfcties of a, explained 76 examination

314 Swift's appeal to the earl of Writers of the present age, ob.

fervations 0.1

395 dr. a supplement to the works of

394 S;kes, Sec Middleton

THE :

Sparte: or small poems morada V Vilainy

, unmalkia

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ly turned

on.

W.

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182, 449

238

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Τ Η Ε

MONTHLY REVIEW,

For JANUARY, 1752.

T

ART. 1.

An Enquiry concerning the Principles of Morals. By David Hume, Esq; 12mo. 35. Millar. HE reputation this ingenious author has acquir'd

as a fine and elegant writer, renders it unnecessary

for us to say any thing in his praise. We shall only observe in general, that clearness and precision of ideas oft abstracted and metaphysical subjects, and at the same time propriety, elegance and spirit, are seldom found united in any writings in a more eminent degree than in those of Mr. Hume. The work now before us will, as far as we are able to judge, considerably raise his reputation; and, being free from that sceptical turn which appears in his other pieces, will be more agreeable to the generality of Readers. His subject is important and interesting, and the manner of treating it easy and natural : His design is to fix the just origin of niorals, in the execution of which he has Thewn a great deal of judgment as well as ingenuity, as every candid reader must needs allow, whatever sentence he may pass upon his scheme in general, or how much soever he may differ from him in regard to what he has advanced on the subject of justice.

In the first section of this performance, our author treats of the general principles of morals; he introduces it with some general reflections, after which he gives a short but clear view of the principal arguments that are urged to prove that morals are derived from reafon, and of those which VOL. VI.

B

are

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are adduced to fhew that they are derived from sentiment, The arguments on both sides he thinks are fo plaulible, that he is apt to fufpeet they may, both of them, be folid and fatisfactory, and that reason and sentiment concur in almost all moral determinations and conclusions. . But tho' this question, says he, concerning the general principle of morals, be extremely curious and important; 'is needless for us, at present, to employ farther care in our enquiries concerning it. For if we can be so happy, in the course of this enquiry, as to fix the just origin of morals, 'will then easily appear how far sentiment or reason enters into all determinations of this nature. Mean while, it will scarce be posible for us, e're this controversy is fully decided, to proceed in at accurate manner required in the

ences ; by beginning with exact definitions of VIRTUE and vice, which are the objects of our present enquiry. But we shall do what may be juftly esteem'd as satisfactory. We fhall consider the matter as an object of experience, We Thail call every quality or action of the mind, virtuous, which is attended with the general approbation of mankind : and we shall denominate vicious, every quality, which is the object of general blame or cenfure. These qualities we shall endeavour to collect; and after examining, on both fides, the several circumstances, in which they agree, 'tis hoped, we may, at last, reach the foundation of ethics, and find those universal principles, from which all moral blame or approbation is ultimately derived. Aš this is a question of fact, not of abilract science, we can only expect success, by following this experimental method, and deducing general maxims, from a comparison of particular instances. The other scientifical method, when a general abstract principle is fuift established, and is afterwards branched out into a varity of inferences and conclufions, may be more perfect in itself, but fuits less the imperfection of human nature, and is a common source of illution and mistake, in this as well as in other subjects. Men are now cured of their passion for Hypotheses and systems in natural philosophy, and will hearken to no arguments but those derived from experience. 'Tis full time they should begin a like reformation in all moral disquisitions ; and reject every system of ethics, however subtile or ingenious, that is not founded on fact and observasion.'

Having laid down the method he intends to prosecute, our Author proceeds in the second section to treat of benevolence; and shews how ill-founded that system of morals

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