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the author is so extravagant in his praises of Elfrida, that we lose the critic in the panegyrift.

VIII. Beauty in danger; or an account of a new distemper communicated by the lips, with an attempt to cure it. 4to. 6s. Owen.

Whatever our readers may think of us after so frank a declaration, we must honestly confess, that we do not understand this performance; which must either proceed from the author's want of perspicuity in explaining his meaning, or from our dulness of apprehension.

IX. N. R.'s account of himself. 8vo. 2s. 6d. Cooper.

A dull, tedious, triAing declamation about some milunderstandings between two persons in the country; below the notice of any one, except the parties concerned.

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CONTROVERSIAL.

X. Candid remarks on some particular pasages in the 5th edition of mr. Whitefield's sermons. printed in 1750. 8vo. I s. Newbery.

We have here a number of sensible observations on some of those doctrinal points by which mr. Whitefield has fo fuccessfully wrought upon the passions of his followers, and so powerfully recommended himself to the common people ; on many of whom these remarks might probably have a very good effect, if they would read them with the fame spirit of moderation, and deference to common sense, with which they are penn'd by their judicious author.

XI. A view of the expediency and credibility of miraculous powers among the primitive christians, after the decease of the apostles

. Represented in a charge delivered to the clergy of the archdeaconry of Sudbury, &c. By John Chapman, D.D. 4t0. 4 s. boards. Birt.

In the first part of this charge the doctor endeavours to thew, that, from the plain design of the chriftian religion, and the fate of heathenism in the Roman empire, a very strong presumption (next to a moral demonstration) arises to us, à priori, for a continuance of some miraculous powers to the church, till the year of Chritt 324. After this he proceeds to establish the general truth of the primitive testimonies with regard to the miraculous powers, and in his notes on the charge, which make two thirds of the work, displays a great deal of learning, without advancing any thing, as far as we are able to judge, that throws new light on the controversy.

R

The X 11. XII. The evidence for christianity contained in the Hebrew words Aleim and Berit, ftated and defended, &c. Being an answer to dr. Sharp's two dissertations concerning the etymology and scripture-meaning of these words. By James Mody, rector of Dunton in Bucks. 8vo. 2s.6d. Withers.

The title of this performance is sufficient, we apprehend, to give our readers fome idea of what may be expected from it.

A XIII. The Lord's-day evening entertainment. By John Mafon, A.M. vols. 3. & 4. 8vo.

8vo. Buckland, &c. See Review, vol. V. for our account of the two firft volumes of this work, p. 387.

MEDICAL. XIV. A letter from an apothecary in London, to his friend in the country; concerning the present practice of phyfic, in regard to empirics, empirical methods of cure, and noftrums: with remarks on the method of curing the itch by externals only. Also observations on manna, and dr. Mead's cure for the bite of a mad-dog. 8vo. I S. Cooper.

Several things are to be found in this pamphlet, worthy the notice of medical readers, or others, who would be infor med concerning the subjects mentioned above.

XV. An enquiry into the origin, nature, and cure of the small-pox. By Thomas Thompson, M.D. 8vo. 35. few'd. Millar.

There is little in this performance, more than may be found in James's physical di&ionary, under the article Variola, which was furnished by this author; who has now prefixed a remarkable address, to dr Mead; in which he finds many faults with the present discipline in the general administration of pbyfic; and is particularly severe on the apothecaries. It is observable, that tho' the title of this treatise mentions the cure of the small-pox, it concludes wichout any practical directions relating to it, which the author refers to a future work.

XVI. A collection of receipts in pbyfic, being the entire practice of an eminent phyfician; containing a cumpleat body of prescriptions answering to every disease: with some in surgery. To which are added, by the editor, occasional remarks, directions, and cautions, fuited to the different stages of distempers, in order to render this work particularly useful in families. 8vo. 25. L. Davis.

The title of this book sufficiently indicates what readers it is chiefly adapted to. , .

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N. B. For the Titles and Subject-Marter of Books,

the Names of their Authors, &c. see the Table of
Contents at the Beginning of the Volume.

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Bale, mr. I. See Original Sin
Dams. See Miracles

the fall of Adam accounted
Adventures of Arabella

for

224
249 -a glorious display of di
Affiliations, the common reme- vine wisdom and goedness
dies for
409

225, Jeg.
Albuquerque's first expedition in Beauty, what

227, seg.
the E Indies

241 * expression," what 229
takes Goa

.242
character and Almeid's British Toast, memoirs of 146

grace, what. ibi feg.
compared .242, feq. Brown mr. animadverfions on
inflance of his severity his three essays on the cha.

245
racteristics 10

152
expedition to Malacă 246

с
death.
248, lea:

Amera obfura 3 21), feq.
Alderman, description of his Candid examination of that

piece of fophiftry, heaven
hall and kitchen

open to all men

313.
daughter 115 Chorus, use of in the old dra.
Analogy between the fluids of

389
animals and vegetables 381 Chriftianity, the main evidences
Ancient Baths, their use in of its truth

432. feq:-
physic

319

Clarke Charles. See Money.
Animai, how produced 374 Colbert, chara&ter of

gro
383, feq. Comers, the use

123
its progress

384 Common frayer, its beauty and
solids, the constituent

holiness

240
parts

$1 Commonwealth, new model of
spirits demonstrated go

84, feq.
Antiseptics, what

47
inconveniences of

89
Arabella, her cruel treatment of Coftard, see differtations
her cousin Glanville 251, seq. Credibility of the old teftament

romantic notions 256 depends on the new 286
her maid Lucy's behaviour Crito
258

D
treatment of mr. Selwin

Discord, fatal consequen..
Attra&tion, how accounted for

ces of

336, feq.
439 Discourses on various subjects in
В B
religion,

301
Alance of power, origin of Disquiktions, ffee and candid re-i

62

294
marks on

ovum

1226

322

161, 331

E

Difquifitions, real design of 63 Fortesque dr. his poetical essays
the tendency iniolent tz

78
Differtation on the scriprure ex. Fofiler's sermon on catholic com.
pressions, the angel of the munion, a defence of

153
Lord, and of J. Chrift 240

discourses on natural
Differtationes 2, critico facræ 74 religion
Divines, in what manner to education of children 17!
proceed as to the facts in the

religious education

172,
christian religion 289, feq.

Jego
Dobbs A. Eig; epifle to 236 proper model for 174
E

instruction should be plain
Duration, what 282 and gradual ib. 175, feq.
Egg, description of 370,

duty of children to pa-
Jeg.

rents
Eli&ricity, a treatise on

of masters and fervants 7.

433
to what owing 439 magistrates and subjects
may cure pervous disor

178
ders

440 tyranny, bow odious it.
Elfrida, extra&ts from ode 11,

liq
addressed to content 391 christianity repugnant there-
Ode IV. on Athelwold's

to

179. feg.
distress

392

the magiftratę no power
Empire, the grounds and rea- over conscience

180
fans of civil

435

minifters of the gospel,
Exeter Bithop of, his Answer to çheir office and qualifications
mr. J. Wesley's letter 312

181
Exile, what

410 respect due from the people
nature and virtue may be

to them

182
enjoy'd in it

41!: Friendship, what
Cicero's conduct therein definition of

427
412,

may subrist between dit-
accounted for

413

ferent dispositions ib.
inconveniencies of Exile but difpofitions not incom-

414 patible
resignation in

4:5

nor only between persons
Experiments on putrefacțion 43 of the same rank ib.

- Jeg subfits longest on sense
on falts
and virtue

479
on myrrh

46 Fructification of a tree or plant
on resins
ib.

375
Expiration, an effect of the

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mind unnecessary to

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476

478

454 Generation, how produced

F4
r. Able, regularity in its con- Geometry, use of 285
truction

388 God, his moral perfections 302
Full of man, an allegory 393 importance of worthy

Tegu potions concerning 305. feg:
Fawkes. See May

Goutrnment the origin of 268
Fluxions applied to the jewish — with the best form 271, fig.

and christian religion 59 Grammar, a philosophical en-
Fordyce mr D. his dialog'ie ci n- quiry concerning an universal
cerning I reaching
416

129
Gravitaling

ib. feq:

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191

13

ib. feq:

15

Gravitation of Bodies, how ac- to as the origin of morality
counted for

440 with regard to the interest of
Greek models of literature re- mankind
commended

144 sentiments of censure and
H

approbation very fimilur 7
Arris Ja. See Grammar qualities immediately a-

greeable to ourselves ib. feq
motion

186, feq.
to others

8
Boerbaave's rejected ib. particularly cleanliness ib.

as also de Gorter's 187 a mysterious manner forms
- dr. Whyut's theory 188, feq: no small part of personal me-
motion of the stomach rit

ib. feq.
190 monkish virtues, why re-
- guts

jected

10
bladder

ib. self-love excluded from
motion of the arteries and our author's theory it
veins accounted for 192

humanity the great spring
penis, its erection ac- of morals
counted for

ib.

obligation to virtue
pupil and muscles of the how far reason or sentia
internal ear

193. feq. ment enters into moral deter-
of some animals, why it

I minations
moves after being cut out nature of justice explain

464
Hiftory ecclefiaftical, remarks how arising from human
430 conventions

16
abuse of by divines 288 property by what means

feq.
determined

17, feqi
its use to fociety and sentiments of morals difs
ftateimen in particular 292, ferent among different nati-

fag:
its use to divines 287, feq. Humility different, false notions
Bolingbroke's letters on the of

338, seg:
ftudy and use of 279 - wherein ic confifts

339
its philosophy

281 Harcbinson's scheme for paying
the several forms of the the publick debis 37
readers of

280 natural death of public
its use and advantage 231 eredit what

38
jeg. - violent death

ib.
how to be studied

remarkable cuftoms in
the periods of history Athens; Rome, and England 39
finee the resurrection of let-

feg
ters

293

the existence of English
Hume David; treatise on morals liberty to what owing 42

prefing Seamen

.
his general definitions of

I
virtue and vice

Deas, origin of
public utility the sole ori-

137
gin of justice

3 Jewish teinple, its destruction
property and justice en folved

58
larged as we enlarge our religion could not co-exift
views

with the christian 6a
hy'utility pleases S

K 2

on

ons

18

295

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