Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, 116. köide

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William Blackwood, 1874

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Page 182 - Life ! we've been long together Through pleasant and through cloudy weather; 'Tis hard. to part when friends are dear — Perhaps 'twill cost a sigh, a tear; — Then steal away, give little warning, Choose thine own time; Say not Good Night, — but in some brighter clime Bid me Good Morning.
Page 564 - The periwinkle trailed its wreaths; And 'tis my faith that every flower Enjoys the air it breathes. The birds around me hopped and played, Their thoughts I cannot measure: — But the least motion which they made It seemed a thrill of pleasure. The budding twigs spread out their fan, To catch the breezy air; And I must think, do all I can, That there was pleasure there.
Page 533 - But the passage from the physics of the brain to the corresponding facts of consciousness is unthinkable. Granted that a definite thought and a definite molecular action in the brain occur simultaneously; we do not possess the intellectual organ, nor apparently any rudiment of the organ, which would enable us to pass, by a process of reasoning, from the one to the other.
Page 34 - To th' instruments divine respondence meet; The silver sounding instruments did meet With the base murmur of the water's fall: The water's fall with difference discreet, Now soft, now loud, unto the wind did call: The gentle warbling wind low answered to all.
Page 34 - Doth first peepe foorth with bashfull modestee, That fairer seemes the lesse ye see her may ! Lo ! see soone after how more bold and free Her bared bosome she doth broad display ! Lo ! see soone after how she fades and falls away...
Page 531 - Abandoning all disguise, the confession that I feel bound to make before you is that I prolong the vision backward across the boundary of the experimental evidence, and discern in that matter, which we in our ignorance, and notwithstanding our professed reverence for its Creator, have hitherto covered with opprobrium, the promise and potency of every form and quality of life.
Page 507 - Majesty's servants, at the desire of several persons of quality, for the benefit of Mr. Wilkes and at the expense of the Constitution...
Page 530 - ... why select so minute, so weak, so bounded a principle, as the reason and design of animals is found to be upon this planet ? What peculiar privilege has this little agitation of the brain which we call thought, that we must thus make it the model of the whole universe...
Page 36 - Said Guyon; See the mind of beastly man, That hath so soone forgot the excellence Of his creation, when he life began, That now he chooseth with vile difference To be a beast, and lacke intelligence.
Page 35 - So passeth in the passing of a day Of mortal life the leaf, the bud, the flower...

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