Faust: A Tragedy

Front Cover
J. Ollivier, 1847 - 8 pages

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 14 - tis said) Before was never made, But when of old the sons of morning sung, While the Creator great His constellations set, And the well-balanced world on hinges hung. And cast the dark foundations deep, And bid the weltering waves their oozy channel keep.
Page 6 - Therefore, because the acts or events of true history have not that magnitude which satisfieth the mind of man, poesy feigneth acts and events greater and more heroical ; because true history propoundeth the successes and issues of actions not so agreeable to the merits of virtue and vice, therefore poesy feigns them more just in retribution, and more according to revealed providence...
Page 23 - With lust and violence the house of God? In courts and palaces he also reigns, And in luxurious cities, where the noise Of riot ascends above their loftiest towers, And injury and outrage: and when night Darkens the streets, then wander forth the sons Of Belial, flown with insolence and wine.
Page 23 - Belial came last, than whom a Spirit more lewd Fell not from Heaven, or more gross to love Vice for itself...
Page 13 - Where wast thou when I laid the foundations of the earth? Declare, if thou hast understanding. Who hath laid the measures thereof, if thou knowest ? Or who hath stretched the line upon it? Whereupon are the foundations thereof fastened? Or who laid the corner stone thereof ; When the morning stars sang together, And all the sons of God shouted for joy?
Page 67 - THERE is in souls a sympathy with sounds, And as the mind is pitched the ear is pleased With melting airs or martial, brisk or grave, Some chord in unison with what we hear Is touched within us, and the heart replies.
Page 16 - From harmony, from heavenly harmony, This universal frame began : When Nature underneath a heap of jarring atoms lay, And could not heave her head, The tuneful voice was heard from high, Arise, ye more than dead ! Then cold and hot, and moist and dry, In order to their stations leap, And music's power obey. From harmony, from heavenly harmony. This universal frame began : From harmony to harmony Through all the compass of the notes...
Page 5 - We owe the great writers of the golden age of our literature to that fervid awakening of the public mind which shook to dust the oldest and most oppressive form of the Christian religion.
Page 33 - Behold, the tabernacle of God is with men, and he will dwell with them, and they shall be his people, and God himself shall be with them, and be their God.
Page 126 - Mid countless brethren with a lonely heart Through courts and cities the smooth savage roams Feeling himself, his own low self the whole ; When he by sacred sympathy might make The whole one self! self, that no alien knows! Self, far diffused as Fancy's wing can travel ! Self, spreading still ! Oblivious of its own, Yet all of all possessing...

Bibliographic information