Climatology and Mineral Waters of the United States, 4. köide

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Wood, 1885 - 386 pages
 

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Page 229 - ... momentum, rising in a column the full size of this immense aperture to the height of sixty feet ; and through and out of the apex of this vast aqueous mass, five or six lesser jets or round columns of water, varying in size from six to fifteen inches in diameter, were projected to the marvellous height of two hundred and fifty feet. These lesser jets, so much higher than the main column, and shooting through it, doubtless proceed from auxiliary pipes leading into the principal orifice near the...
Page 230 - ... every shadow which the denser clouds of vapor, interrupting the sun's rays, cast upon the column, could be seen a luminous circle radiant with all the colors of the prism, and resembling the halo of glory represented in paintings as encircling the head of Divinity. All that we had previously witnessed seemed tame in comparison with the perfect grandeur and beauty of this display. Two of these wonderful eruptions occurred during the twenty-two hours we remained in the valley. This geyser we named...
Page 230 - ... scalloped edges. Not one of our company supposed that it was a geyser ; and among so many wonders it had almost escaped notice. While we were at breakfast upon the morning of our departure a column of water, entirely filling the crater, shot from it, which, by actual triangular measurement, we found to be two hundred and nineteen feet in height.
Page 30 - If so, being more readily observed than organic matter itself, it may be taken as a test, and the amount will be a measure of the impurity. A room that has a smell indicating recent residence will, in a certain time, have its objects covered with organic matter ; and this will be indicated by ammonia on the surface of objects. After some preliminary trials, seeing this remarkable constancy of comparative results and the beautiful gradations of amount, it occurred to me that the same substance must...
Page 31 - ... organic matter; and this will be indicated by ammonia on the surface of objects. After some preliminary trials, seeing this remarkable constancy of comparative results and the beautiful gradations of amount, it occurred to me that the same substance must be found on all objects around us, whether in a town or not. I therefore went a mile from the outskirts of Manchester and examined the objects on the way. Stones that not twenty hours before had been washed by rain, showed ammonia. It is true...
Page 229 - It was foaming and surging at a terrible rate, occasionally emitting small jets of hot water nearly to the mouth of the orifice. All at once it seemed seized with a fearful spasm, and rose with incredible rapidity, hardly affording us time to flee to a safe distance, when it burst from the orifice with terrific momentum, rising in a column the full size of this immense aperture to the height of sixty feet...
Page 29 - That is the general statement which this paper illustrates. It is now many years since it was observed by me that organic matter could be found on surfaces exposed to exhalations from human beings ; but it is not till now that the full significance of the fact has shone on me, and the practical results that may be drawn from it in hygiene and meteorology. These results are the great extension of the idea that ammonia may be an index of decayed matter. The idea itself has been used partly, and to...
Page 30 - It comes from all living organisms, and is equally necessary to build them up. To do this, it must be wherever plants or animals grow or decay. As it is volatile, some of it is launched into the air, on its escape from combination ; and in the air it is always found. As it is soluble in water, it is found wherever we find water on the surface of the earth, or in the air, and probably in all natural waters, even the deepest and most purified. As a part of the atmosphere, it touches all substances...
Page 376 - ... sunshine and out-door exercise. Without these no climate is promotive of health or propitious for the cure of disease; and with them it is safe to say the human powers of accommodation are such that it is difficult, to distinguish the peculiarities of any climate by their joint results on the health and longevity of its subjects.
Page 229 - No water could be discovered, but we could distinctly hear it gurgling and boiling at a great distance below,- Suddenly it began to rise, boiling and spluttering, and sending out huge masses of steam, causing a general stampede of our company, driving us some distance from our point of observation.

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