The Claims of Religion Upon Medical Men: A Discourse Delivered in the Tenth Presbyterian Church, Philadelphia, on Sunday Evening, Nov. 24, 1844

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Book and Job Printing Office, Ledger Building, 1844 - 24 pages
 

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Page 21 - At thirty man suspects himself a fool ; Knows it at forty, and reforms his plan ; At fifty chides his infamous delay, Pushes his prudent purpose to resolve; In all the magnanimity of thought Resolves and re-resolves; then dies the same.
Page 14 - If any of you lack wisdom, let him ask of God, who giveth to all men liberally, and upbraideth not, and it shall be given him,
Page 12 - For it was not an enemy that reproached me ; then I could have borne it : neither was it he that hated me that did magnify himself against me ; then I would have hid myself from him : 13 But it was thou, a man mine equal, my guide, and mine acquaintance. 14 We took sweet counsel together, and walked unto the house of God in company.
Page 8 - Go ye into all the world and preach the Gospel to every creature. He that believeth and is baptized shall be saved; he that believeth not shall be damned.
Page 15 - ... may succeed, as, without it, the ablest must prove unavailing. " Save me from all sordid motives ; and endow me with a spirit of pity and liberality towards the poor, and of tenderness and sympathy towards all ; that I may enter into the various feelings by which they are respectively tried ; may weep with those that weep, and rejoice with those that rejoice. " And sanctify thou their souls, as well as heal their bodies.
Page 24 - I am the Resurrection and the Life, saith the Lord ; he that believeth in me, though he were dead, yet shall he live, and whoso liveth and believeth in me shall never die.
Page 23 - They put on as smooth a face as they can, to impose on the spectators and die firmly. But this is all deception ; the true state of their minds at the very time, nine times out of ten, is worse than the most horrible imaginings even of hell itself. Some who have led lives adapted to sear their...
Page 8 - ... friends. Medicine, of all professions, should be the least suspected of leading to impiety. An intimate acquaintance with the works of nature elevates the mind to the most sublime conceptions of the Supreme Being, and at the same time dilates the heart with the most pleasing prospects of Providence.
Page 15 - I may enter into the various feelings by which they are respectively tried ; may weep with those that weep, and rejoice with those that rejoice. " And sanctify thou their souls, as well as heal their bodies. Let faith and patience, and every Christian virtue they are called upon to exercise, have their perfect work : so that in the gracious dealings of thy Spirit and of thy providence, they may find in the end, whatever that end may be, that it has been good for them to have been afflicted. " Grant...
Page 13 - The defence of that book," says he, " against the learned and acute Mr. Abr. De Moivre, being written in a spirit of levity and resentment, I most sincerely retract, and wish undone, so far as it is personal or peevish and ask him and the world pardon for it ; as I do for the defence of Dr. Pitcairn's ' Dissertations' and the 'New Theory of Fevers,' against the late learned and ingenious Dr.

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