An Enquiry Into the Duties of Men in the Higher and Middle Classes of Society in Great Britain, Resulting from Their Respective Stations, Professions, and Employments, 1. köide

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B. & J. White, 1797
 

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Page 81 - I exhort therefore, that, first of all, supplications, prayers, intercessions, and giving of thanks, be made for all men; for kings, and for all that are in authority; that we may lead a quiet and peaceable life in all godliness and honesty.
Page 285 - I say unto you my friends, Be not afraid of them that kill the body, and after that have no more that they can do. But I will forewarn you whom ye shall fear: Fear him, which after he hath killed hath power to cast into hell; yea, I say unto you, Fear him.
Page 357 - That King James II., having endeavoured to subvert the constitution of the kingdom, by breaking the original contract between king and people ; and by the advice of Jesuits and other wicked persons, having violated the fundamental laws and having withdrawn himself out of the kingdom, has abdicated the government, and that the throne is thereby vacant.
Page 84 - Natural allegiance is therefore a debt of gratitude, which cannot be forfeited, cancelled, or altered, by any change of time, place, or circumstance, nor by any thing but the united concurrence of the legislature.
Page 81 - I exhort, therefore, that, firft of all, " fupplications, prayers, intercefilons, and giving " of thanks, be made for ALL MEN-, for kings, " and for all that are in authority, that we may " lead a quiet and peaceable life in all godlinefs " and honefty- For this is good and acceptable " in the fight of God our Saviour; who will <c have ALL MEN to be faved, and to come to the
Page 35 - I, c. 10, which abolished the court of star chamber, effectual care is taken to remove all judicial power out of the hands of the king's privy council ; who, as then was evident from recent instances, might soon be inclined to pronounce that for law which was most agreeable to the prince or his officers. Nothing therefore is more to be avoided, in a free constitution, than uniting the provinces of a judge and a minister of state.
Page 326 - In these no man should take up arms, but with a view to defend his country and its laws; he puts not off the citizen when he enters the camp...
Page 398 - UDGES ought to remember that \ their office is jus dicere, and not | jus dare ; to interpret law, and I not to make law, or give law. | Else will it be like the authority claimed by the church of Rome ; which, under pretext of exposition of Scripture, doth not...
Page 83 - Natural allegiance is such as is due from all men born within the king's dominions immediately upon their birth...
Page 26 - III ) but, because that every man ought of right to defend the king and his realm, therefore the king at his pleasure...

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