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Also 11 & 12 Vict. c. 43, is repealed in section 35 from the words “nor to any information ” to the words “or post office.”

Under section 29 of the Summary Jurisdiction Act, 1879, the Lord Chancellor is empowered to make rules, &c., regarding procedure, &c., under the Act.

RULES. Rules relating to the following matters were made December 12, 1879 :

Regarding register to be kept by clerk of court ; returns under section 22; entry of receipts; form of account of fines and where payment is deferred; remitted fee book; entry of receipts by clerk; unnecessary accounts ; Crown fines ; special appropriation of fine under statute; application of sum due under forfeited security; form of security; security book ; notice to principal of forfeiture of security ; mode of application to vary order for sureties ; time for stating special case ; date of order of commitment; rules 19 to 24 relate to judgment summons, civil debts, &c.; rules 26 and 27, judgment debtor, &c.; rule 28, costs in enforcing order; rule 29, fee for declaration; rule 30, forms in schedule to be used, with variations according to circumstances. The forms in Summary Jurisdiction Act, 1848, sections 1 and 2, annulled.

SCHEDULE OF FORMS. Part I. consists of 47 forms applicable to summary proceedings other than proceedings for the recovery of a civil debt.

Part II. Forms applicable to proceedings for the recovery of a civil debt (nine in number).

Part III. General Forms.-1. R ister. 2. Account of fines and fees. 3. Remitted fee book. 4. Return of Exchequer fines, penalties, &c.

Note.—The governor of a prison is not required to take the recognizance of any person proposed as surety unless such person can produce a written certificate from a court of summary jurisdiction, or its clerk, that he is able to pay the amount for which he is to be bound.

SUMMARY JURISDICTION (PROCESS) ACT, 1881.

(44 & 45 Vict. c. 24.) An Act to amend the Law Respecting the Service of Process of

Courts of Summary Jurisdiction in England and Scotland.
Section 2.- The Act does not apply to Ireland.
Section 3.-Commencement of Act, October, 1881.

Service of Section 4 enacts that, subject to the provisions of this Act, any process of

process issued under the Summary Jurisdiction Acts may, if issued English court in

by a court of summary jurisdiction in England and endorsed by Scotland a court of summary jurisdiction in Scotland, or issued by a court and of Scotch court

of summary jurisdiction in Scotland, and endorsed by a court in England. of summary jurisdiction in England, be served and executed

within the jurisdiction of the endorsing court in like manner as it may be served and executed within the jurisdiction of the issuing court, and that by an officer either of the issuing or of the endorsing court.

The section contains further provisions as to issue and endorsement of process, issue of warrant, &c.; also how application of

the Act to process issued in cases of civil debt, &c. Provision as Section 5.—Where a person is apprehended under any process to execution executed in pursuance of this Act, such person shall be forthwith of process.

taken to some place within the jurisdiction of the court issuing the process, and be there dealt with as if he had been there apprehended. The section contains provisions regarding execution of distress, &c., when endorsed in England and Scotland.

Section 6.—Provisions as to bastardy proceedings in England and Scotland.

Section 8 defines expressions used in ActThe expression “process” includes any summons or warrant of citation to appear either to answer any information or complaint, or as a witness, also warrants of commitment, imprisonment, distress, &c.

The expression “ officer of a court of summary jurisdiction” means the constable, officer, or person to whom any process issued by the court is directed, or who is by law requir or authorized to serve or execute any process issued by the court.

The “Indorsement in Backing a Process ” is given in schedule to Act.

IV. THE CRIMINAL LAW AMENDMENT ACT, 1885.

This Act is not epitomised, but given IN EXTENSO in Appendix, See p. 517.

APPENDIX.

I. RULES MADE BY SECRETARY OF STATE FOR GOVERNMENT, &c.,

OF POLICE.
II. CIRCULARS OF SECRETARY OF STATE.
III. SCALES OF PAY.
IV. EXPENSES OF PROSECUTOR AND WITNESSES.

V. CONTAGIOUS DISEASES IN ANIMALS.
VI. FIRST AID TO INJURED.
VII. TREATMENT OF CASES OF DROWNING, HANGING, &c.
VIII. PoisoNS AND ANTIDOTES.
IX. DISINFECTION, &c.
X. CRIMINAL LAW AMENDMENT ACT, 1885.

I. RULES FOR GOVERNMENT, &c., OF POLICE. Rules made by the Right Hon. HENRY AUSTIN BRUCE, one of Her

Majesty's Principal Secretaries of State, pursuant to the 3rd section of 2 & 3 Vict. c. 93, for establishing an uniform system for the government pay, clothing, accoutrements, and necessaries for constables appointed under that Act.

Whitehall, August, 1873.

QUALIFICATIONS.

CHIEF CONSTABLE. His age, except he is promoted or transferred from another office in the police, or under other special circumstances to be approved of by the Secretary of State, must not exceed 45 years.

He must be certified by a medical practitioner to be in good health, and of sound constitution, and fitted to perform the duties of the office.

He must be recommended to the Secretary of State by the magistrates in whom the appointment is vested as a person of good character and qualifications.

SUPERINTENDENT OR INSPECTOR,

His age must not exceed 40 years, and he must be not less than five feet seven inches high, without his shoes, except he is promoted or transferred from another office in the police, or under other special cir. cumstances to be approved of by the Secretary of State, on the recommendation of the chief constable, concurred in by two justices of the peace in petty sessions assembled.

He must be a man of good character and general intelligence, able to read and write well, and to keep accounts.

He must be certified by a medical practitioner to be in good health, of sound constitution, and fitted to perform the duties of the office.

SERGEANT OR CONSTABLE.

His age must not exceed thirty-five years, and he must be not less than five feet seven inches high, without his shoes, subject to the same exception as in the case of superintendent or inspector.

He must be able to read and write, intelligent and active, and of good character and connections; and must be certified by a medical practitioner to be in good health, of a sound constitution, and fitted to perform the duties of the office.

If a candidate for any of the above offices has been previously employed in any branch of the public service, civil or military, he shall not be eligible for appointment, unless he produces satisfactory testimonials of his conduct in such service; and a person who has been dismissed from any police force shall not be eligible for appointment in any other police force.

No person shall be appointed to, or retained in, any of the preceding offices who shall hold any other office or employment for bire or gain (section 10, 2 & 3 Vict. c. 93); (unless the duties of such other office or employment shall be recognized, and their performance sanctioned as police duties by the Secretary of State) or who shall sell or have any interest in the sale of any beer, wine, or spirituous liquors.

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The following rates of pay are intended to be exclusive of any ex. penses of office, stationery, travelling on duty, or purchase of a horse, cart, or forage, for which separate provision or allowances should be made.

The chief constable’s pay, whether he is appointed for one county alone, or for two or more adjoining counties, or parts of counties, is not to be less than 250l, or more than 5001. a year, except in special cases, when a higher rate of pay may be given, subject to the approval of the Secretary of State. The apportionment of his pay, when he is appointed for more than one county, being arranged by mutual agree ment between the justices of the counties for which he acts.

The superintendent's pay is to be not less than 5s.6d, or more than 11s. a day; but a superintendent acting as deputy chief constable may, with the approval of the Secretary of State, be given an allowance beyond the maximum rate of pay fixed for a superintendent.

The inspector's pay is to be not less than 4s. 2d. or more than 58. 6d. a day.

The sergeant's pay is to be not less than 3s. 7d. or more than 4s. a day.

The constable's pay is to be not less than 2s. 6d. or more than 3s. 4d. a day.

Constables are not to receive for their own use any fees, which, by the 17th section of 3 & 4 Vict. c. 88, are to be paid to the treasurer of the county; but the above rates of pay are intended to be exclusive of any allowance for extraordinary expenses under the 18th section of 2 & 3 Vict. c. 93.

CLOTHING.

Superintendents, inspectors, sergeants, and constables are to be supplied with the following articles, in addition to their pay, viz. :

Annually.

One coat with badge.
Two pairs of trowsers.
One pair of boots.
One pair of shoes.
One hat, helmet, or cap.
One stock.

Biennially.
One great coat and badge.

When required, but not more frequently than once in every Three Years.

One cape and one pair of leggings.

ACCOUTREMENTS AND NECESSARIES.

A constable’s staff, a pair of handcuffs, and a belt and lantern, are to be supplied to each constable. Sabres may be supplied to mounted constables, and a cutlass may be supplied to any constable whose beat is so situated that, in the opinion of two justices of the county in petty sessions assembled, it is necessary for his personal protection in the performance of his duty. The cutlass is to be worn at night only, or at times when rioting or serious public disturbance has actually taken place or is apprehended. A chief constable may, upon any sudden

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