Law and the Arts

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Greenwood Publishing Group, 1999 - 256 pages


This interdisciplinary study examines the relationships between law and the humanities. The goal of the essays is to promote exchanges of ideas in such diverse, but related fields as law, literature, film, theater, communication, art, and architecture and to inspire readers to think about the laws hidden in the interstices of the arts as well as the artistry of the law.

On the one side, chapters focus attention on legal restraints in the media, censorship of the arts, copyright protection issues on the Internet, and artists' rights in the past and in the present cyberspace era. On the other, the role played by law in literature and theater is examined, and one essay explores the architectural design of the U.S. Supreme Court and how its architects fit into political history. A collection valuable to scholars, researchers, and lay readers alike with interests in the relationships between law and the humanities.

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Contents

CENSORSHIP AND TV
3
CENSORSHIP AND THE ARTS
17
Art and Repression in the McCarthy Era
23
The Old Problem of New Communications Technologies Can We Do Better This Time?
29
Law and Cyberspace
45
COPYRIGHT PROTECTION OF ART AND THE INTERNET
47
COPYRIGHT LAWS AND COMPUTERS
67
Law and Literature
79
SHYLOCK V ANTONIO ON APPEAL
149
The Trial of Shylock from The Merchant of Venice
153
Appellants Brief
171
Appellees Brief
177
Appellants Reply Brief
185
Shylock v Antonio on Appeal The Deliberations
189
Thoughts of a Literary Judge
213
Shylock on Appeal
217

HERMENEUTICS AND THE RACIAL LAWS AND LITERATURE OF FRANCE
81
UNJUST LAWS MORALITY AND INTERPRETATION
93
THE AUTHOR AS UNCENSORED LAWYER IN FRANCE
103
Law Literary Theory and Critical Legal Theory A Forum
113
Critical Legal Theory
115
Law and Shakespeare
147
Law and Art
237
LAW AND ARCHITECTURE
239
Index
245
About the Editor and Contributors
251
Copyright

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Page 161 - The attribute to awe and majesty, Wherein doth sit the dread and fear of kings ; But. mercy is above this sceptred sway, It is enthroned in the hearts of kings, It is an attribute to God himself; And earthly power doth then show likest God's When mercy seasons justice. Therefore, Jew, Though justice be thy plea, consider this — That in the course of justice, none of us Should see salvation : we do pray for mercy; And that same prayer doth teach us all to render The deeds of mercy.
Page 161 - It blesseth him that gives and him that takes. Tis mightiest in the mightiest; it becomes The throned monarch better than his crown; His sceptre shows the force of temporal power, The attribute to awe and majesty, Wherein doth sit the dread and fear of kings; But mercy is above this sceptred sway, It is enthroned in the hearts of kings, It is an attribute to God himself; And earthly power doth then show likest God's When mercy seasons justice.
Page 161 - The quality of mercy is not strain'd, It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven Upon the place beneath: it is twice blest, It blesseth him that gives, and him that takes, 'Tis mightiest in the mightiest, it becomes The throned monarch better than his crown.
Page 62 - ... (1) the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for nonprofit educational purposes; (2) the nature of the copyrighted work; (3) the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole; and (4) the effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work.
Page 69 - Congress shall have power to promote the progress of science and the useful arts, by securing for limited times to authors and inventors the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries, and to make all laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into execution the foregoing powers.
Page 202 - Gratiano speaks an infinite deal of nothing, more than any man in all Venice. His reasons are as two grains of wheat hid in two bushels of chaff : you shall seek all day ere you find them, and when you have them, they are not worth the search.
Page 154 - Signior Antonio, many a time and oft In the Rialto you have rated* me About my moneys and my usances :* Still have I borne it with a patient shrug; For sufferance is the badge of all our tribe. You call me misbeliever, cut-throat, dog, And spit upon my Jewish gaberdine, And all for use of that which is mine own.
Page 38 - ... any comment, request, suggestion, proposal, image, or other communication which is obscene or indecent, knowing that the recipient of the communication is under 18 years of age...
Page 38 - ... to display in a manner available to a person under 18 years of age, any comment, request, suggestion, proposal, image, or other communication that, in context, depicts or describes, in terms patently offensive as measured by contemporary community standards, sexual or excretory activities or organs...
Page 154 - Or Shall I bend low and in a bondman's key, With bated breath and whispering humbleness, Say this ; ' Fair sir, you spit on me on Wednesday last ; You spurn'd me such a day ; another time You call'd me dog ; and for these courtesies I'll lend you thus much moneys

About the author (1999)

SUSAN TIEFENBRUN is the Director of International Law Programs, the Administrative Director of the Center for Communication Law and Technology, and an Adjunct Professor of Law at the Hofstra University School of Law. She taught French literature at Columbia University and Sarah Lawrence College for more than twenty years before becoming a lawyer, and she has written extensively in the field of law and literature.

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