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PAPA.-Crabs in general are very quarrelsome creatures; they frequently have serious contests by means of those formidable weapons, their great claws.

HENRY. Will they not live a great while without food?

PAPA.-Yes. Fishermen say, that they will live confined in a basket for many months without any other food

a than what they derive from the sea-water; and that even in this situation they will not decrease in weight.

ANNA.- I suppose all crabs live in the sea.

PAPA.-They are chiefly inhabitants of the sea; some, however, live in the fresh waters, and a few on land.

Z. Z.

DESCRIPTION OF BRITISH TREES.

No. XXIII.

Hazel-Nux. The Hazel, Corylus, or Nux Silvestris, is a tree much valued for its fruit, and in many ways useful, though never growing to sufficient size for timber. The flower is a small blossom of the most beautiful red, found on the branches in the middle of January. The fruit needs not to be described. What we call Filberts are not a different species, but merely a variety, supposed to have their name, Full-beards, from their longer brushes.

“ The use of the Hazel is for poles, spars, hoops, forks, angling rods, faggots, cudgeols, coals, and springes to catch birds. There is no wood which purifies wine sooner than chips of Hazel.”—Evelyn.

Evelyn tells us, the Hazel cut in the form of a fork, had many magical properties formerly, for which it was made into divining rods, to detect murders, discover the situation of springs, and other subterraneous treasures, which we need not now certify.

“ But the most signal honour it was ever employed in, which might deservedly exalt this humble and common plant above all the trees of the wood, is that of hurdles; not for that it is generally used for

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the folding of our innocent sheep, an emblem of the church, but for making the walls of one of the first Christian Oratories in the world ; and particularly in this Island, that venerable and sacred fabrick at Glastonbury, found by St. Joseph of Arimathea, which is storied to have been first composed but of a few small Hasel-rods interwoven about certain stakes driven into the ground: and walls of this kind, instead of laths and puncheons, super-induced with a coarse mortar, made of loam and straw, do to this day inclose divers humble cottages, sheds, and out-houses in the country."--EVELYN.

“ Le noisetier n'est célèbre que par la superstition de la baguette divinatoire faite de branches légères, &c. Jacques Hymar, paysan de St. Veran, se rendit tres-célèbre dans cet art, sous la régence du Duc d'Orleans. Il prétendoit découvrir, avec sa baguette, non seulement les eaux, les mines, les trésors cachés sous terre, mais encore les cadavres, leurs meurtriers, et même les traces de ces meurtriers. Mons. le Regent le fit venir à Paris, et toute cette cour, composée en grande partie d'esprits forts, qui ne croyoient pas en Dieu, fut émerveillée des miracles opérés par Jacques Aymar."-GENLIS.

HYMNS AND POETICAL RECREATIONS.

On observing the Evening Star grow larger and brighter as it

approached the horizon.

AT even-tide,
When the sun was gone,

I saw a star
The only one-

It was so small,
So faintly bright,

It seem'd no more
Than the glow-worm's light:

So very sad,
So very wan,

I thought it wept
Its going down;

And did not like
To quench its fires,

When other stars
Where lighting theirs.

I watch'd that Star-
I saw it sink

Nearer and nearer
To the brink :

There was a cloud It pass'd it through,

And larger and larger I saw it grow.

Gone was the hue Of sickly white

Its cheek was now Of the vermil bright

I saw a light
Its form unfold,

As if its locks
Were of streaming gold.

Thou lovely Star! I know 'twas so

Thou look'dst so sad For haste to go:

Thou didst not like To shine alone

In the cold, cold night, When thy Sun was gone.

That vermil tint, That glow so bright,

That halo beam Of celestial light

O they were like What spirits feel,

When they bid the world A last farewell.

Thou didst not set, Thou didst not fade,

Thou didst not quench Thy beams in shade

Thou wert but sad For haste to flee

From a world too dark, Too cold for thee.

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