John Cassell's illustrated history of England. The text, to the reign of Edward i by J.F. Smith; and from that period by W. Howitt, 7. köide

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Page 311 - April 24, 1793, of a committee of the House of Commons appointed to inquire into the state of the...
Page 79 - You well know, gentlemen, how soon one of those stupendous masses, now reposing on their shadows in perfect stillness — how soon, upon any call of patriotism or of necessity, it would assume the likeness of an animated thing, instinct with life and motion — how soon it would ruffle, as it were, its swelling plumage, how quickly it would put forth all its beauty and all its bravery, collect its scattered elements of strength, and awaken its dormant thunder.
Page 369 - Philosophers — to obtain a more general attention to the objects of Science, and a removal of any disadvantages of a public kind which impede its progress.
Page 210 - MY DEAR LORD, I am honoured with his Majesty's commands to acquaint your lordship that all difficulties to the arrangements in progress will be obviated by a declaration in the House to-night from a sufficient number of peers that, in consequence of the present state of affairs, they have come to the resolution of dropping their further opposition to the Reform Bill, so that it may pass without delay, and as nearly as possible in its present shape.
Page 111 - I will never exercise any power, authority, or influence which I may possess by virtue of the office of to injure or weaken the Protestant church as it is by law established in England, or to disturb the said church, or the bishops and clergy of the said church, in the possession of any rights or privileges to which such church, or the said bishops and clergy, are or may be by law entitled.
Page 314 - They will here meet with ruts, which I actually measured, four feet deep, and floating with mud, only from a wet summer — what, therefore, must it be after a winter?
Page 137 - You will consider whether the removal of those disabilities can be effected consistently with the full and permanent security of our establishments in Church and State, with the maintenance of the reformed Religion established by law, and of the rights and privileges of the Bishops and of the Clergy of this Realm, and .of the Churches committed to their charge.
Page 79 - ... for action. You well know, gentlemen, how soon one of those stupendous masses, now reposing on their shadows in perfect stillness, — how soon, upon any call of patriotism, or of necessity, it would assume the likeness of an animated...
Page 112 - Ireland, with a view to such a final and conciliatory adjustment as may be conducive to the peace and strength of the united kingdom ; to the stability of the Protestant establishment ; and to the general satisfaction and concord of all classes of his majesty's subjects.
Page 262 - ... bestowed for the benefit of individuals, sometimes squandered for purposes injurious to the character and morals of the people. We therefore feel it to be our duty to represent to YOUR MAJESTY that the existing Municipal Corporations of England and Wales neither possess nor deserve the confidence or respect of YOUR MAJESTY'S subjects, and that a thorough reform must be effected, before they can become, what we humbly submit to YOUR MAJESTY they ought to be, useful and efficient instruments of...

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