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Raamatud Books 1 - 10 of 10 on ... forms ? Again, if we turn from Art to Letters, truth to nature and to fact is....
" ... forms ? Again, if we turn from Art to Letters, truth to nature and to fact is undoubtedly a characteristic of sterling literature ; and yet in the delineation of outward nature itself, still more in that of feelings and affections, of the secret parts... "
Pharmaceutical Journal;: A Weekly Record of Pharmacy and Allied Sciences - Page 137
1879
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The General Baptist repository, and Missionary observer [afterw.] The ...

1877
...quantities, reveals truth that pertains to reality, is very elegant and true. Says the President — " Again, if we turn from Art to Letters, truth to nature...to that of which there is no direct counterpart in recognised speech. And yet which of us cannot find a meaning for these literary figures, an inward...
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The Popular Science Monthly: Supplement

1877
...delineation of outward Nature itself, still more in that of feelings and affections, of the secret springs of character and motives of conduct, it frequently...recognized speech. And yet which of us cannot find a meaning for these literary figures, an inward response to imaginative poetry, to social fiction,...
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Van Nostrand's Engineering Magazine, 19. köide

1878
...impress us, and have an interest over and above their antiquarian value; unless it be that they are symbols which, although hard of interpretation when...recognized speech. And yet which of us cannot find a meaning for these literary figures, an inward response to imaginative poetry, to social fiction,...
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The Electrical Review, 6. köide

1878
...impress us, and have an interest over and above their antiquarian value ; unless it be that they are symbols which, although hard of interpretation when...to that of which there is no direct counterpart in recognised speech. And yet which of us cannot find a meaning for these literary figures, an inward...
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The Journal of Science, and Annals of Astronomy, Biology, Geology ..., 15. köide

James Samuelson, Sir William Crookes - 1878
...means to which the artist often has recourse in order to convey his meaning and to fulfil his mission ? Again, if we turn from art to letters, truth to nature...to that of which there is no direct counterpart in recognised speech. Passing to the second of the three methods — viz., that of manifold space —...
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The University Magazine, 2. köide

1878
...delineation of outward nature itself, still more in that of feelings and affections, of the secret springs of character and motives of conduct, it frequently...to that of which there is no direct counterpart in recognised speech. And yet which of us cannot find a meaning for these literary figures, an inward...
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The Dublin University Magazine: A Literary and Political Journal, 92. köide

1878
...delineation of outward nature itself, still more in that of feelings and affections, of the secret springs of character and motives of conduct, it frequently...to that of which there is no direct counterpart in recognised speech. And yet which of us cannot find a meaning for these literary figures, an inward...
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The Year-book of Facts in Science and Art

Charles W. Vincent, James Mason - 1879
...impress us, and have an interest j over and above their antiquarian value, unless it be that they are symbols which, although hard of interpretation when...recognized speech. And yet which of us cannot find a meaning for these literary figures, an inward response to imaginative poetry, to social fiction,...
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Report

British Association for the Advancement of Science - 1879
...these again to almost Again if we turn from Art to Letters, truth to nature and to fact is nndoubtedly a characteristic of sterling literature ; and yet...give utterance to that of which there is no direct •counted in recognised speech. And yet which of us cannot find a meaning for these literary figures,...
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Report of the Annual Meeting, 48. köide

British Association for the Advancement of Science. Meeting - 1879
...and motives of conduct, it frequently happens that the writer is driven to imagery, to an analog}-, or even to a paradox, in order to give utterance to that of which there is no direct counterpart in recognised speech. And yet which of us cannot find a meaning for these literary figures, an inward...
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