Plato's Progress

Front Cover
CUP Archive, 1966 - 311 pages
Plato's Progress deals with scholarly questions of datings and developments, showing and demanding familiarity with a wide literature.
 

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Contents

Aristotle and Plato page
1
Plato
7
Conclusion
19
Gamesaudiences
32
The mammoth dialogues
44
Who invited Plato to come to Syracuse in 367? page
55
The real Dion
68
The forger
82
THE TIMETABLE
216
The foundation of the Academy
222
The Critias
230
The Timaeus page
238
The Republic
244
The Philebus
251
The Laws
256
The Phaedrus
259

Aristotle and Sicily
90
DIALECTIC
102
The earlier history of dialectic
110
Platos dialectic visàvis eristic
126
The philosophical value of dialectic
132
Conclusion
144
The charges against Socrates page
146
Evidence
154
Platos codefendants
182
Epilogue
191
The minuting of debates
199
From eristic to philosophy
205
The Cratylus
272
The Theaetetus
275
The Sophist
280
IS The Politicus
285
The Parmenides
286
A stylometric difficulty
295
Acknowledgements
301
Indices A General
303
B Persons Real and Mythical
305
Places Real and Mythical
308
Individual Texts of Aristotle Diogenes Laertius Isocrates Plato Plutarch and Xenophon
309
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About the author (1966)

Gilbert Ryle exerted an influence over academic philosophers in the English-speaking world almost without equal at midcentury. As Waynefleet Professor of Philosophy at Oxford University and as G. E. Moore's successor to the editorship of Mind, the most prestigious philosophical journal in Great Britain, Ryle shaped the orientation of philosophical discussion for more than a decade. Independently of Ludwig Wittgenstein, he invented a philosophical method of linguistic analysis, maintaining indeed that systematic confusions in theory stemmed from misleading grammatical expressions. Ryle's most remarkable contribution to philosophy, however, was in the area of philosophy of mind. His crowning achievement was The Concept of Mind (1949). Utilizing his method of linguistic analysis on a discourse about mind and the mental, he maintained that the radical distinction between mind and body, Cartesian dualism, stemmed from category mistakes. A felicitous writer with a distinctively colloquial style free of jargon, Ryle invented phrases---such as "the ghost in the machine" to indicate supposed Cartesian mental substance---that still reverberate in the literature of philosophy and psychology.

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