The romance of the peerage; or, Curiosities of family history, 3. köide

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Page 265 - ... else ; I must do it, as it were, in such weight, measure and number, even so perfectly, as God made the world ; or else I am so sharply taunted, so cruelly threatened, yea presently sometimes with pinches, nips, and bobs, and other ways (which I will not name for the honour I bear them) so without measure mis-ordered, that I think myself in hell, till time come that I must go to Mr.
Page 265 - God made the world ; or else I am so sharply taunted, so cruelly threatened, yea presently sometimes with pinches, nips, and bobs, and other ways (which I will not name for the honour I bear them) so without measure mis-ordered, that I think myself in hell, till time come that I must go to Mr.
Page 194 - The lord Cobham, who was now to play his part, and by his former actions promised nothing but matiere pour rire, did much cozen the world ; for he came to the scaffold with good assurance and contempt of death. He said some short prayers after his minister, and so outprayed the company that helped to pray with him, that a stander by said, " He had a good mouth in a cry, but was nothing single.
Page 213 - ... in this business ; for to execute Grey, who was a noble young spirited fellow, and save Cobham, who was as base and unworthy, were a manner of injustice.
Page 391 - ... her to reap the fruits of it. But Edward, earl of Hertford, being entangled with her fair eyes, and she having a tang of her grandfather's ambition, left Rodney, and married the earl.
Page 307 - During the treaty it is reported that the King remitted the matter to his counsel, and that some of the table in the freedom of counsellors (the King being present) did put the case, — that if God should take the King's two sons without issue, that then the kingdom of England would fall to the King of Scotland, which might prejudice the monarchy of England. Whereunto the King himself replied ; That if that should be, Scotland would be but an accession to England, and not England to Scotland ; for...
Page 19 - I spake, what of grief and choler. as much against him as I could, and I think he, standing at the door, might very well hear the worst that I spoke of himself. In the end, I saw she was resolved to defend him and to cross me.
Page 10 - The thing that most she thirsteth after is victory, and it seemeth to be indifferent to her to have her enemies diminished either by the sword of her friends or by the liberal promises and rewards of her purse, or by...
Page 214 - ... good estate, which held us in the rain more than half an hour ; but being come to a full point, the sheriff stayed him, and said, he had received orders from the king, to change the order of the execution, and that the Lord Cobham was to go before him...
Page 42 - Secretary had too much wit ever to live under a man that had foreign stock, having been so fortunate under a woman that was tractable and to be counselled. The Lady told him that he need not long triumph upon her poor brother's mishap, for if he kept in this mind she could expect no better end of him than the same or a worse destiny.

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