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XXI. Around the World, No. 11.-The Holy Land

I. From Damascus to Mount Tabor. [ Whittier,Pope,- 225

Mrs. Hemans,Robinson.].

228

II. Mount Tabor to Jerusalem.-Battle of Mount Tabor. 230

[Headley.]—Death and Burial of Moses. [Pierpont,

-Bryant, -Mrs. Alexander.]-Jericho. [Pierpont.] 235

-Jerusalem. [Whittier.] ·

236

III. In and Around Jerusalem. [Cowper,- Whittier,-

Tappan.)

238

XXII. The Story of Bou-Akbar. (Suggested. Philip Gilberi Ha:

merton.]

245

XXIII. Around the World, No. 12.–From Jerusalem to Jaffa 252

I. Hebron, and the Valley of Elah

II. Speech of Goliath, the Philistine Chief. (Hannah More.j 254

III. Speech of the Stripling David. [Hannah More.]

IV. From Elah to Jaffa

256

XXIV. A Letter from Ralph Duncan

I. Ralph, and Phil Barto .

258

II. An Evening with the Lawyers. [Selections.]

XXV. Around the World, No. 13.—To Egypt

265

I. From Jaffa to Alexandria

265

II. Battle of the Nile

266

III. Alexandria to Cairo

268

IV. At Cairo.--A Story of the Mission School. [Rev. H. M.

Field.]

269

V. The Battle of the Pyramids :

270

VI. Up the Nile.—The Ruins of Thebes. [Pope --Aken-

side.].

272

VII. Address to the Mummy. [Horace Smith.]

275

VIII. Thebes As it Was, and As it Is. [Rev. H. M. Field.] 276

IX. The Religion of the Ancient Egyptians. [Rev. H. M.

Field.]

277

XXVI. Progress and Adventure

279

I. Stage-Coaches and Railways

279

A stage-Coach Adventure. [Dr. Johnson.].

280

II. A Kindergarten School

285

XXVII. Around the World, No. 14.–From "Alexandria to Gib:

raltar

289

I. Malta, Carthage, and Tunis.' [ Tasso.]

II. Cato's Soliloquy on Immortality. [Addison.]

292

III. Onward to Gibraltar

XXVIII. The Coupon Bonds. [Trowbridge. Adapted.] :

294

Part I. Mysterious Doings

294

Part II. A Night of Alarms

Part III. A Chapter of Adventures

305

Part IV. Happy Ending of the Story

313

XXIX. Around the Worlă, No. 15.—From Gibraltar to the Cape

of Good Hope

317

I. Madeira and the Canaries. (Camoens.]

317

II. The Gardens of Armida. [Leigh Hunt, —Camoens.] 320

III. Climate and Trade-Winds.-The Warning. [ Tinsley's

Magazine.]

323

IV. Monrovia.-Equatorial Calms. ` [Coleridge, Byron,

-T. D. English.]

326

V. St. Helena. [ Montgomery.]

VI. Napoleon at St. Helena. [Byron.]

VII. Death of Napoleon. [Isaac M’Lellan.] .

289

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VIII. Character of Napoleon. [W. E. Channing.)

IX. Onward to the Cape. [Camoens.]

x. The Spacious Firmament. (Andrew Marvell.j

XXX. Authors and their Writings

337

I. A Love of Books. [Edward Everett Hale,-Shak

speare,- Waller, Fenelon,–Gibbon,- Petrarch,-

Herschel, - Channing, - Charles Sprague, - Sir

T ho8. Overbury.]

341

II. Laurence Sterne:-The Story of Le Fevre. [Sierne.] 342

III. Leigh Hunt and his Writings.

347

1. Within Prison Walls. [Leigh Hunt.]

2. Abou Ben Adhem and the Angel. [Leigh Hunt.]

XXXI. Around the World, No. 16.-From the Cape to Bombay 350

I. At the Cape

II. Mauritius.—Bombay and its People :

XXXII. What Freddy's Letter Gave Rise to

359

I. The Treatment of Animals. [Shakspeare,—Corper.] 359

II. The Story of Androcles and the Lion. [Adapted.] · 360

III. Poetic Version of the Story. [Cowper.]

XXXIII. Around the World, No. 17.–From Bombay to Calcutta

and Rangoon .

I. Railroad Journey across Hindostan

365

II. Calcutta, As We Saw it

367

III. The Blind Man and the Elephant. (John G. Šaxe.] 368

IV. Onward to Rangoon

XXXIV. More of Mr. Bardou's Philosophy .

371

1. Life and its Duties. [Emile Souvestre. Adapted.] 371

II. The Brevity of Human Life. [Quarles.]

373

III. Devout Philosophers. [Sir Isaac Newton, Victor

Hugo]

375

XXXV. Around the world, No. 18. [Rev. H. M. Field. Adapted.] 376

I. Rangoon and the Buddhists

376

The Pagoda Bells. [Mrs. Judson.]

378

"That which ye Sow ye Reap.” (Edwin Arnold.]

II. Onward to Singapore

381

XXXVI. Home Scenes and Interests

I. Ralph Duncan

Another Moon Story: (Hans Andersen. "Adapted.] 385

II. Daisies. (All the Year Round.]

389

III. Among Books. (Bion,--Colton,--Horace, Pope, 391

Prescott, Milton,-Burns,- London Economist.] 394

XXXVII. Around the World, No. 19.–From Singapore to Japan 395

I. The Great Indian Archipelago. [Rev. H. M. Field.

Adapted.]

395

II. Hong-Kong, Canton, and the Cantonese. [Brei

Harte.]

III. A Chinese Story. (Christopher P. Cranch.)

IV. Chinese Peculiarities

402

V. Onward to Japan.--The Japanese

VI. An Episode.- Enceladus." [Longfellow.j

VII. Telegraphing Home

Thought and the Telegraph. [G. A. Hamilton.] 411

XXXVIII. Philosophical and Historical .

412

I. Mr. Bardou's Philosophy Again. [Ėmile Souvestre:

Adapted.].

II. Webster and Benton. [Peter Harrey. Adapted.] 414

III. Poetry and Philosophy: [Higgins,-Scott,-Crabbe.] 421

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CHAPTER

PAGE

429

XXXIX. Around the World, No. 20.-From Japan to San Fran-
cisco

422
I. Homeward Route.-Change in our Calendar

422
II. Honolulu.-Volcanoes and Earthquakes

424
III. Approaching Land. — Parting Scenes. [W. Scott.] 426
XL. Eloquence and Oratory

429
I. The Road to their Attainment
II. Hamlet's Instruction to the Players. [Shakspeare.] 432
III. Modulation in Reading and Speaking. [Lloyd.] 434
IV. Alaric the Visigoth. - The Dirge of Alaric. [E. 435
Everett.].

435
V. Speech of Rienzi to the Romans. '[Miss Milford.] 439
XLI. Around the World, No. 21. — From San Francisco,
Home!

441
I. Carl Hoffmann Again
II. A Surprise .

442
III. The Press.— Newspaper Correspondents

443
IV. On the Iron Road." (Mackay.]

444
What the Engines Said. [Bret Harte.]
XLII. The Welcome Home
Part I. Introductory

448

Part II. The American Indian. [Charles Sprague.] 450

Part III. The Inflexible Mr. Leslie. [English Magazine.] 452

1. The Prologue.-2. The Dramatic Scene

452

Part IV. Mrs. Rose's Tea-Party. [Adapted, from a bor-

rowel manuscript.] .

460

XLIII. Supplementary Chapter.-A Kansas Letter

469

The Volunteer Counsel. [Anon. An Adaptation.]

471

Appendix

477

THE FIFTH

FIFTH READER.

CHAPTER I.-INTRODUCTORY.

1. At the beginning of a new volume, let it be understood that we are still at Lake View, and that we have now something additional to record about the school there, which we hope may interest and profit our readers.

2. In connection with the founding and steady growth of the muse'um, there has been established a school library, of moderate dimensions, but specially adapted to the educational wants of the pupils. The books which it comprises are not only present helps to the pupils in their studies, and in their school exercises, but they are perhaps still more important to them as landmarks and guides to broader fields of knowledge.

3. The practice of giving, to all the pupils, short “gem selections" for memorizing and for recitation, has been continued; while the reading selections, made by the pupils themselves from books other than their regular readingbooks, and from the current literature of the day, have been greatly extended.

4. As might be expected, pupils are found to exhibit a great variety of tastes in their selections; for while some have a fancy for battle pieces, spirited declamations, or scenes of thrilling dramatic interest, there are more, especially among the young ladies, who choose stories of affection and home life, in which the tender and the pathetic prevail; while others delight to dwell on the varied scenes which nature displays, in her thousand forms of beauty, of grandeur, and of power.

11

5. It is in 'iße last two years of school education that the reading selections take the widest range, especially with the young men of the school, who then begin to think seriously of preparation for the active duties of life. With many of them the selections and compositions then as. sume a decidedly practical character; and the teacher takes special pains in directing pupils to the best sources of information relating to the great industries of life,—the various trades and professions, - agriculture, commerce, and the mechanic arts;—for to this line of study the library and the museum are admirably adapted.

6. New and inviting fields of thought are thus opened to the pupils; and the pieces selected, and the sources from which they were obtained, are never failing topics of conversation with the young people, who have learned, ere this, that there is something more in education than merely conning the lessons of the school-room.

7. Recently still another, and a valuable feature, has been added to the occasional reading exercises of the older pupils. It consists in setting apart particular days for reading from the works of certain distinguished authors. For example, there is one day for Washington Irving, one for Bryant, one for Whittier, one for Holmes, one for Longfellow, one for Tennyson, one for Shakspeare, one for Mil. ton, one for Addison and other essayists of the same era, and one for Homer,—ten in all. These are designated as “Irving's Day,” “Longfellow's Day,” “Tennyson's Day,” etc.; and they are so arranged as to be conveniently distributed, for school purposes, throughout the year.

8. Many of the pupils write out their selected readings on foolscap paper of uniform size, writing on only one side of the paper, and leaving wide margins, so that the contributions of a term, or of a year, may be conveniently bound together, and preserved in the museum.

9. What an amount and variety of selections will thus be gathered here, in the course of a few years !—and with

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