The Poetical Works of Alexander Pope. ...

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Bell and Daldy, 1866
 

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Page 152 - The world recedes ; it disappears ! Heaven opens on my eyes ! my ears With sounds seraphic ring ! Lend, lend your wings ! I mount ! I fly ! O grave, where is thy victory ? O death, where is thy sting...
Page 82 - The only point where human bliss stands still, And tastes the good without the fall to ill ; Where only merit constant pay receives, Is...
Page 3 - Ten censure wrong for one who writes amiss; A fool might once himself alone expose, Now one in verse makes many more in prose. Tis with our judgments as our watches, none Go just alike, yet each believes his own.
Page 85 - What conscience dictates to be done, Or warns me not to do, This, teach me more than hell to shun, That, more than heaven pursue.
Page 77 - Honour and shame from no condition rise ; Act well your part, there all the honour lies.
Page 49 - Two Principles in human nature reign; Self-love, to urge, and Reason, to restrain; Nor this a good, nor that a bad we call, Each works its end, to move or govern all: And to their proper operation still, Ascribe all Good; to their improper, 111.
Page 36 - Say first, of God above or man below What can we reason but from what we know ? Of man what see we but his station here, From which to reason, or to which refer? Through worlds unnumber'd though the God be known, 'Tis ours to trace him only in our own.
Page 46 - Cease then, nor order imperfection name : Our proper bliss depends on what we blame. Know thy own point : This kind, this due degree Of blindness, weakness, Heaven bestows on thee.
Page 17 - The reader's threatened (not in vain) with 'sleep'. Then, at the last and only couplet fraught With some unmeaning thing they call a thought, A needless Alexandrine ends the song, That, like a wounded snake, drags its slow length along.
Page 55 - Vice is a monster of so frightful mien. As to be hated needs but to be seen ; Yet seen too oft, familiar with her face, We first endure, then pity, then embrace.

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