Report of the Annual Meeting

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Contents

Communication ordered to be printed in extenso
cvi
General Meetings
cxxviii
Note on the Peritoneum in Meles taxus By Professor RICHARD
3
Investigation of the Upper Atmosphere by Means of Kites in cooperation
31
Meteorological Observations on Ben Nevis Report of the Committee consist
56
Report on the Theory of Pointgroups Part III By Frances HARDCASTLE
65
Seismological Investigations Eighth Report of the Committee consisting
77
Isomorphous Sulphopic Derivatives of Benzene Fourth Report of the Com
85
Absorption Spectra and Chemical Constitution of Organic Substances
126
Address by the President Sir NORMAN LOCKYER K C B LL D F R
135
On the Possibility of Making Special Reports more available than at present
169
The Study of Hydroaromatic Substances Report of the Committee con
179
Lifezones in the British Carboniferous Rocks Report of the Committee
185
The Movements of Underground Waters of Northwest Yorkshire Fourth
192
Photographs of Geological Interest in the United Kingdom Fourteenth
197
Estuarine Deposits at Kirmington Lincolnshire Preliminary Report of
218
Erratic Blocks of the British Isles Eighth Report of the Committee consisting
231
Observations on Changes in the Sea Coast of the United Kingdom Report
258
Occupation of a Table at the Zoological Station at Naples Report
282
Index Generum et Specierum ânimalium Report of the Committee consist
288
Bird Migration in Great Britain and Ireland Sixth and Final Report
289
The State of Solucion of Proteids Report of the Committee consisting
304
The Factory Acts and Infant Mortality
361
Small Screw Gauge Report of the Committee consisting of Sir W
378
Anthropometric Investigation in Great Britain and Ireland Report of
389
Archaeological and Ethnological Researches in Crete Report of the Com
402
Silchester Excavations Report of the Committee consisting of Mr ARTHUR
412
Botanical Photographs Report of the Committee consisting of Professor
416
The Teaching of Science in Elementary Schools Report of the Committee
429
The Conditions of Health essential to the Carryingon of the Work
455
Corresponding Societies Committee Report of the Committee consisting
465
Address by Professor WALTER NOEL HARTLEY D Sc F R S F R S E
602
Action of Malt Diastase on Potatostarch Paste By BERNARD F Davis
604
The Application of Low Temperatures to the Study of Biological Pro
611
Sur le Spectre de Selfinduction du Silicium et ses comparaisons
620
Fluorescence as related to the Constitution of Organic Substances
628
GEOLOGY
641
Report of the Committee on Life Zones in the British Carboniferous
660
TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 15
666
SECTION E GEOGRAPHY
701
The Influence of Icemelting upon Oceanic Circulation By Professor
712
On Map Projections suited to general purposes By G J MORRISON
719
TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 15
725
Address by EDWARD W BRABROOK C B President of the Section
729
FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 11
741
Physical Degeneration and the Poverty Line By Mrs H BOSANQUET
747
The Equipment of the Manchester Municipal Technical Institute
773
On Electrical Propulsion as the General Means of Transport By JAMES
779
History of the Discovery of Natural Gas in Sussex Heathfield District
785
A further Note on Gasengine Explosions By H E WIMPERIS
789
Sawedged Paläoliths By Mrs C STOPES
804
Report of the Committee on Archæological and Ethnological Researches
816
Some Points about Crosses chiefly Celtic By Miss A A BULLEY
822
Address by A C SEWARD M A F R S President of the Section
824
The Botany of Upper Peru By A W IIill M A
853
Modern Views on the Phylogeny of the Alge By Dr F F BLACKMAN
858
Plants on the Serpentine Rocks in the NorthEast of Scotland By
864
FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 11
882
INDEX
889
F R
915
Queensland By J P THOMSON
5

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Page 477 - ... give a stronger impulse and a more systematic direction to scientific inquiry, — to promote the intercourse of those who cultivate Science in different parts of the British Empire, with one another and with foreign philosophers, — to obtain a more general attention to the objects of Science, and a removal of any disadvantages of a public kind which impede its progress.
Page 544 - Say not the struggle naught availeth, The labour and the wounds are vain, The enemy faints not, nor faileth, And as things have been they remain. If hopes were dupes, fears may be liars; It may be, in yon smoke concealed, Your comrades chase e'en now the fliers, And, but for you, possess the field.
Page lxxxviii - It is composed of representatives of management and labour both in the United Kingdom and in the United States of America. In the United Kingdom section the constituent bodies are the Federation of British Industries, the British Employers' Confederation and the Trades Union Congress.
Page 28 - Britain in the domain of learning and discovery, and what they alone can bring. I have also endeavoured to show how, when this is done, the nation will still be less strong than it need be if there be not added to our many existing councils another, to secure that even during peace the benefits which a proper co-ordination of scientific effort in the nation's interest can bring shall not be neglected as they are at present. Lest some of you may think that the scientific organisation which I trust...
Page ci - In view of the increasing importance of science to the nation at large, your committee desire to call the attention of the Council to the fact that in the corresponding societies the British Association has gathered in the various centres represented by these societies practically all the scientific activity of the provinces. The number of members and associates at present on the list of the corresponding societies approaches 25,000, and no organization...
Page 6 - It is a struggle between organized species — nations— not between individuals or any class of individuals. It is, moreover, a struggle in which science and brains take the place of swords and sinews, on which depended the result of those conflicts which, up to the present, have determined the history and fate of nations. The school, the university, the laboratory and the workshop are the battlefields of this new warfare.
Page 6 - Huxley pointed out that we were in presence of a new ' struggle for existence,' a struggle which, once commenced, must go on until only the fittest survives. It is a struggle between organised species — nations — not between individuals or any class of individuals. It is, moreover, a struggle in which science and brains take the place of swords and sinews, on which depended the result of those conflicts which, up to the present, have determined the history and fate of nations.
Page 455 - The report of the committee on the conditions of health essential to the carrying on of the work of instruction in schools...
Page 27 - Haldane has recently reminded us that " the weapons which science places in the hands of those who engage in great rivalries of commerce leave those who are without them, however brave, as badly off as were the dervishes of Omdurman against the Maxims of Lord Kitchener.
Page c - ... Your committee are of opinion that further encouragement should be given to these societies and their individual working members by every means within the power of the Association ; and with the object of keeping the corresponding societies in more permanent touch with the Association they suggest that an official invitation on behalf of the Council be addressed to the societies, through the corresponding societies...

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