The Quarterly Review, 146. köide

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John Murray, 1878
 

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Page 338 - With daring aims irregularly great. Pride in their port, defiance in their eye, I see the lords of human kind pass by, Intent on high designs — a thoughtful band, By forms...
Page 280 - What was said of Rome, adorned by Augustus, may be applied by an easy metaphor to English poetry embellished by Dryden, " lateritiam invenit, marmoream reliquit." He found it brick, and he left it marble.
Page 224 - That the raising or keeping a standing army within the kingdom in time of peace, unless it be with consent of parliament, is against law.
Page 338 - Stern o'er each bosom reason holds her state With daring aims irregularly great ; Pride in their port, defiance in their eye, I see the lords of human kind pass by...
Page 321 - The Parliament of Great Britain sits at the head of her extensive empire in two capacities: one as the local legislature of this island, providing for all things at home, immediately, and by no other instrument than the executive power; the other, and I think her nobler capacity, is what I call her imperial character, in which as from the throne of heaven, she superintends all the several inferior legislatures, and guides and controls them all, without annihilating any.
Page 146 - One, — what a rapture is his. Who in moonlight and music thus sweetly may glide O'er the Lake of Cashmere, with that One by his side ! If woman can make the worst wilderness dear. Think, think what a heaven she must make of Cashmere...
Page 146 - Whatever withdraws us from the power of our senses, whatever makes the past, the distant, or the future predominate over the present, advances us in the dignity of thinking beings.
Page 227 - Majesty and this present Parliament, that a body of forces should be continued for the safety of the United Kingdom, and the defence of the possessions of Her Majesty's Crown, and that the whole number of such forces should consist of one hundred and.
Page 280 - Of Dryden's works it was said by Pope, that " he could select from them better specimens of every mode of poetry than any other English writer could supply.
Page 312 - Let Fortune empty her whole quiver on me, I have a soul, that, like an ample shield, Can take in all, and verge enough for more.

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