The Chemical News and Journal of Industrial Science; with which is Incorporated the "Chemical Gazette.": A Journal of Practical Chemistry in All Its Applications to Pharmacy, Arts and Manufactures, 38. köide

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Chemical news office, 1878
 

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Page 121 - AN INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF CHEMICAL PHILOSOPHY : being a preparatory View of the Forces which concur to the Production of Chemical Phenomena. By J. FREDERIC DANIELL, FRS Professor of Chemistry in King's College, London ; and Lecturer on Chemistry and Geology in the Hon. East India Company's Military Seminary at Addiscombe ; and Author of Meteorological Essays.
Page 78 - But it does not therefore by any means follow that upon a more enlarged basis the formulae are incapable of interpretation ; on the contrary, the difficulty at which we have arrived indicates that there must be some more comprehensive statement of the problem which will include cases impossible in the more limited, but possible in the wider view of the subject.
Page 83 - ... line of demarcation between that which is a matter of knowledge, and that which is at all events something else, and to treat the one category as fairly claiming our assent, the other as open to further evidence'. And yet, when he sees around him those whose aspirations are so fair, whose impulses so strong, whose receptive faculties so sensitive, as to give objective reality to what is often but a reflex from themselves, or a projected image of their own experience, he will be willing to admit...
Page 44 - Ammonia must ever be one of the most interesting of chemical compounds. It comes from all living organisms, and is equally necessary to build them up. To do this, it must be wherever plants or animals grow or decay. As it is volatile, some of it is launched into the air on its escape from combination ; and in the air it is always found. As it is soluble in water, it is found wherever we find water on the surface of the earth or in the air, and probably in all natural waters, even the deepest and...
Page 220 - As it is impossible to enable the reader to recognise rocks and minerals at sight by aid of verbal descriptions or figures, he will do well to obtain a wellarranged collection of specimens, such as may be procured from Mr. TENNANT (149, Strand), Teacher of Mineralogy at King's College, London.
Page 83 - ... must conform if those elements are to issue in precise results. From the data of a problem she can infallibly extract all possible consequences, whether they be those first sought or others not anticipated ; but she can introduce nothing which was not latent in the original statement. Mathematics cannot tell us whether there be or be not limits to time or space ; but to her they are both of indefinite extent, and this in a sense which neither affirms nor denies that they are either infinite or...
Page 77 - Without its aid social life, ur the History of Life and Death, could not be conceived at all, or only in the most superficial manner. Without it we could never attain to any clear ideas of the condition of the Poor, we could never hope for any solid amelioration of their condition or prospects. Without its aid sanitary measures, and even medicine, would be powerless. Without it the politician and the philanthropist would alike be wandering over a trackless desert.
Page 44 - ... impurity. A room that has a smell indicating recent residence will, in a certain time, have its objects covered with organic matter, and this will be indicated by ammonia on the surface of objects. After some preliminary trials, seeing this remarkable constancy of comparative results, and the beautiful gradations of amount, it occurred to me that the same substance must be found on all objects around us whether in a town or not; I therefore went a mile from the outskirts of Manchester and examined...
Page 117 - D.Sc. until after the expiration of two Academical Years from the time of his obtaining the Degree of B.Sc.
Page 76 - ... measurement, and by the importance which is attached to numerical results. And this very necessary condition for progress may, I think, be fairly described as one of the main features of scientific advance in the present day. If it were my purpose, by descending into the arena of special sciences, to show how the most various investigations alike tend to issue in measurement, and to that extent to assume a mathematical phase, I should be embarrassed by the abundance of instances which might be...

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