Merry Songs and Ballads, Prior to the Year 1800, 3. köide

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John Stephen Farmer
Priv. print. for subscribers only, 1897
 

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Page 120 - I wak'd, and straight I knew I lov'd so well it made my dream prove true: Fancy, the kinder Mistress of the two, Fancy had done what Phillis wou'd not do!
Page 121 - LET us drink and be merry, dance, joke, and rejoice, With claret and sherry, theorbo and voice! The changeable world to our joy is unjust, All treasure's uncertain, Then down with your dust! In frolics dispose your pounds, shillings, and pence, For we shall be nothing a hundred years hence.
Page 119 - Flow'rs which, so press'd by her, became more sweet. From the bright vision's head A careless veil of lawn was loosely spread: From her white temples fell her shaded hair, Like cloudy sunshine, not too brown nor fair; Her hands, her lips, did love inspire; Her every grace my heart did fire: But most her eyes, which languish'd with desire. "Ah, charming fair," said I, "How long can you my bliss and yours deny?
Page 271 - Ye'll blear out a' your een, John, and why should you do so ? Gang sooner to your bed at e'en, John Anderson my jo. John Anderson my jo, John, when Nature first began To try her canny hand, John, her...
Page 253 - Ah what a trembling I feel when I venture, Ah what a Trembling does usher my joy! When, with a Sigh, she accords me the blessing, And her Eyes twinkle 'twixt pleasure and pain; Ah what a joy 'tis, beyond all Expressing, Ah what a joy to hear, shall we again...
Page 78 - THERE was a lady of the North Country, Lay the bent to the bonny broom And she had lovely daughters three. Fa la la la, fa la la la ra re 2 There was a knight of noble worth Which also lived in the North.
Page 85 - They then would sell their hose and smock Ere they so long would tarry. Winter nights are long, you know, And bitter cold the weather, Then who's so fond to lie alone When two may lie together?
Page 75 - ... For coaches and horses, and persons of fame : It looked at first sight like a field full of flame, Which made me ride up tantivee. " There hath not been seen such a sight since Adam's, For perriwig, ribbon, and feather. Hide Park may be termed the market of Madams, Or Lady-Fair, chuse you whether ; Their gowns were a yard too long for their legs, They shew'd like the rainbow cut into rags, A garden of flowers, or a navy of flags, When they all did mingle together.
Page 102 - Taylor that gives so good regard; He never goes to measure Lace, But his Maid, but his Maid, but his Maid holds out his Yard. O the Blacksmith, the lusty, lusty Blacksmith, The best of all good Fellows; He never heats his Iron hot, But his Maid, but his Maid, but his Maid must blow the Bellows.
Page 46 - ... By selling of Ale some mony is got, If every man honestly pay for his pot; By this we may keep the Wolf from the door, And live in good fashion, though now we live poor ; If we have good custome, we shal have quick sale ; So may we live bravely by selling of Ale.

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