The Journal of Steam Transport and Husbandry. Dec. 1833, 39. köide

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Smith, Elder & Company, 1834
 

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Page 52 - ... motion. She continued to move on. All were still incredulous. None seemed willing to trust the evidence of their own senses. We left the fair city of New York; we passed through the romantic and ever-varying scenery of the highlands ; we descried the clustering houses of Albany; we reached its shores; and then, even then, when all seemed achieved, I was the victim of disappointment. Imagination superseded the influence of fact. It was then doubted, if it could be done again ; or if done, it was...
Page 48 - These inquiries have led the Committee to believe that the substitution of inanimate for animal power, in draught on common roads, is one of the most important improvements in the means of internal communication ever introduced. Its practicability they consider to have been fully established ; its general adoption will take place more or less rapidly, in proportion as the attention of scientific men shall be drawn by public encouragement to further improvement.
Page 51 - I told you it was so; it is a foolish scheme ; I wish we were well out of it.' I elevated myself upon a platform, and addressed the assembly. I stated that I knew not what was the matter ; but if they would be quiet, and indulge me for half an hour, I would either go on or abandon the voyage for that time.
Page 51 - Folly. Never did a single encouraging remark, a bright hope, or a warm wish, cross my path. Silence itself was but politeness, veiling its doubts, or hiding its reproaches.
Page 27 - But, why were capitalists not told that instead of locomotives being ' more effective,' and the ' wear and tear less,' on the Bristol line, as compared with the Manchester line, it must be greater. For ' the road upon the whole between Manchester and Liverpool is so level," says one account of the Railway by Mr. TT Bury, page 2, ' that, with the exception of two inclined planes at Rainhill, there is no greater inclination than in the ratio of about one in 880, or six feet in a mile : so that at the...
Page 61 - Carpmael, who had taken accurate minutes of the loss of time occasioned by stoppages, that the average rate of travelling had been seven miles per hour. Thus there can be no doubt, that, with a well constructed engine of greater power, a steam carriage conveyance between London and Birmingham, at a velocity unattainable by horses, and limited only by safety, might be maintained...
Page 12 - Unhappily, however, not even the ' most eminent engineers,' nor the ' undoubted talents and activity of the Surveyors,' have been able to prevent a fourth break down in the professional estimate, the cost having risen from 17,0002.
Page 2 - The Committee of 1821 expressed a hope "that the great body of the Occupiers of the Soil, either from the Savings of more prosperous times, or from the Credit which punctuality commands in this Country, possess resources which will enable them to surmount the difficulties under which they now labour.
Page 51 - ... doing one's duty. Fulton, the inventor of the steamboat in North America, which, in a few years, has produced such an astonishing change in that vast country, by connecting together its most distant states, sustained the mortification of not being comprehended by his countrymen. He was, therefore, treated as an idle projector, whose schemes would be useless to the world and ruinous to himself.
Page 2 - that the complaints of the Petitioners are founded in fact, in so far as they represent that at the present price of Corn, the returns to the Occupier of an Arable Farm, after allowing for the Interest of his Investment, are by no means adequate to the charges and outgoings, of which a considerable proportion can be paid only out of the Capitals, and not from the Profits of the Tenantry.

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