The Chautauquan: A Weekly Newsmagazine, 10. köide

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Chautauqua Press, 1890

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Page 25 - Nature never did betray The heart that loved her; 'tis her privilege Through all the years of this our life, to lead From, joy to joy: for she can so inform The mind that is within us, so impress With quietness and beauty, and so feed With lofty thoughts, that neither evil tongues, Rash judgments, nor the sneers of selfish men, Nor greetings where no kindness is, nor all The dreary intercourse of daily life, Shall e'er prevail against us, or disturb Our cheerful faith that all which we behold Is...
Page 391 - He found us when the age had bound Our souls in its benumbing round ; He spoke, and loosed our heart in tears. He laid us as we lay at birth On the cool flowery lap of earth...
Page 498 - If we knew that there was one person, and but one, in the whole congregation, that was to be the subject of this misery, what an awful thing it would be to think of! If we knew who it was, what an awful sight would it be to see such a person...
Page 15 - For all things are yours ; whether Paul, or Apollos, or Cephas, or the world, or life, or death, or things present, or things to come ; all are yours ; and ye are Christ's ; and Christ is God's.
Page 370 - I would rather sit on a pumpkin and have it all to myself than be crowded on a velvet cushion.
Page 370 - There is some of the same fitness in a man's building his own house that there is in a bird's building its own nest. Who knows but if men constructed their dwellings with their own hands, and provided food for themselves and families simply and honestly enough, the poetic faculty would be universally developed, as birds universally sing when they are so engaged?
Page 205 - I can command the lightning, and am dust ! A monarch and a slave ; a worm a god...
Page 13 - GOD be merciful unto us, and bless us ; And cause his face to shine upon us. That thy way may be known upon earth, Thy saving health among all nations.
Page 159 - tis a common proof, That lowliness is young ambition's ladder, Whereto the climber upward turns his face; But when he once attains the upmost round, He then unto the ladder turns his back, Looks in the clouds, scorning the base degrees By which he did ascend.
Page 205 - The sands or the sun's rays ; but God ! for Thee There is no weight nor measure ; none can mount Up to thy mysteries. Reason's bright spark, Though kindled by Thy light, in vain would try To trace Thy counsels, infinite and dark : And thought is lost ere thought can soar so high, Even like past moments in eternity.

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