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PUBLISHED FOR THE PROPRIETORS BY THOMAS F. A. DAY,

13, CAREY STREET, LINCOLN'S INN.

1856.

800

شاسا

LONDON:

PRINTED BY THOMAS F. A. DAY, CAREY STREET,

LINCOLN'S INN.

CONTENTS OF VOLUME LII.

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ANALYTICAL DIGEST, SELECTED AND

CLASSIFIED.

House of Lords' Appeals, 454, 470

Scotch Appeals to the House of Lords, 311, 328

Privy Council Appeals, 293

Chancery Appeals, 359, 374, 389, 406, 550
Appeals under the Winding-up Acts, 408, 422
Bankruptcy Appeals, 343

Common Law Appeals, 423, 439, 534, 550
POINTS IN EQUITY PRACTICE, 11, 178, 370, 387,
401, 560

LAW OF VENDOR AND PURCHASER, 338, 357, 369

LAW OF EVIDENCE, 357

ATTORNEYS AND SOLICITORS.

15, 16, 31, 33, 36, 49, 51, 68, 84, 88, 96, 97,
98, 106, 109, 142, 143, 145, 155, 160, 165,
178, 181, 190, 192, 193, 213, 229, 230, 242,
260, 273, 281, 792, 309, 325, 372, 373, 388,
404, 416, 418, 434, 447, 185, 500, 512, 513,
516, 527, 560

PROCEEDINGS OF LAW SOCIETIES.

Birmingham Law Society, 127

Hull Law Society, 226

The Legal Observer,

AND

SOLICITORS' JOURNAL.

"Still attorneyed at your service."-Shakespeare.

SATURDAY, MAY 3, 1856.

THE TREATY OF PEACE.

its result not only increase the prosperity of this great Commercial Country throughout IN the former state of the Law relating all its various classes, (depending as they to the contents of Newspapers, we should not do on each other,) but largely tend to the have been permitted to set forth or descant advantage of the Legal Profession, for whaton the great Treaty of Peace which was an- ever promotes the wealth, and increases the nounced to both Houses of Parliament on population of a country, must enhance the Monday last, the 28th April. It must be interests of those whose clients multiply acknowledged, however, that we were libe- both in number and riches. We trust, inrally dealt with by the Government autho- deed, that "a good time is coming," which rities in the construction of the Statutes will re-instate our brethren in that prosagainst the publication of "news or obser- perity which they formerly possessed; and vations on public events." Our humble that, notwithstanding the ravages which Journal, as the first Weekly Law Periodical, have been perpetrated by hasty and illhas often been noticed in Parliament and advised changes in the rules of Law and the Courts of Law on questions relating to the regulations of professional Practice, an publications devoted chiefly to science and honourable, well-educated, energetic, and literature, but which sometimes animad- intelligent body of men must still continue verted on transactions of a political nature or which affected the community at large.

to conduct the practical business of the Courts, and advise, guide, and aid the suitors in their varied, important, and often complicated affairs.

Indeed, it may be admitted that in stating and commenting upon the various measures of Law Reform (for which purpose Although the Treaty of Peace, and its the Legal Observer was chiefly established) appendant Conventions, have appeared in all we were frequently dealing with topics not the papers, we think our readers will aplimited to the Profession alone in any of its prove of its being permanently recorded in branches, but importantly affecting the these pages. Every intelligent lawyer, inpublic in general. We believe that there is deed, ought to be acquainted with the scarcely any subject in the wide range of several clauses of these remarkable State newspaper topics so interesting to the ma- documents, which we trust will long conjority of Englishmen as the due administration of Justice in all its various departments; and this general feeling proves convincingly the high sense of justice which prevails throughout the kingdom. Hence we see a large and prominent space allotted to "Law Reports and Intelligence" in all our daily papers.

We consider also that this more than
European Compact, which well-nigh esta-
blishes the peace of the whole world, will in
VOL. LII.
No. 1,469.

tinue as a great Chapter in the International Law of the Seven Kingdoms,-the rulers of which are parties thereto.

The several articles of the Treaty which more particularly affect the interests of Great Britain are the 11th, 12th, 14th, 15th, 16th, 17th, and 23rd. In addition to which is the following Convention relating to the important subject of Maritime Law:

"That Maritime Law, in time of war, has long been the subject of deplorable disputes;

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