The Scientific Proceedings of the Royal Dublin Society, 2. köide

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Page 442 - ... goes back to human consciousness, from which every man of science has to proceed as his consciousness. This consciousness, just on account of the abnormal character of things, is not the same in all. If the normal condition of things had not been broken, consciousness would emit the same sound from all ; but as a matter of fact, this is not the case. In the one the consciousness of sin is very powerful and strong, in the other it is either feeble or entirely wanting.
Page 346 - of the top of a gigantic balloon struggling to get up through the rock." Camp 194, in the canon, was at an altitude of about...
Page 543 - Now, then, for the first time, we have an explanation of the circumstances under which so large a quantity of gold is, as is well known to be the case, exported to the west from Khoten, and finds its way into India from Thibet; and it is probable that the search for gold in this region has been going on from a very remote antiquity, since no one can read the ex-Pundit's account of the Thibetan miners " living in tents some seven or eight feet below the surface of the ground, and collecting the excavated...
Page 442 - Sun may be 2° on either side of its mean place, and the Moon 5°. The relative position of the two bodies may therefore vary 7° from their mean position at any time, and recurring eclipses might be expected to differ widely from the predicted time, or might not occur at all. But, as a matter of fact, this is not the case, the irregularities being reduced almost to nothing by the following remarkable relations. At the end of a Saros, not only are the Sun, the Moon, and the node found nearly in their...
Page 259 - ... edn, 1837, 1, pp. 229-30) Mr Everest found that, in 1831, the number of cubic feet of water discharged by the Ganges per second was, during the Rains, (4 months) .... 494,208 Winter, (5 months) . . . 71,200 Hot weather, (3 months) . . 36,330 so that we may state in round numbers, that 500,000 cubic feet flow down during the four months of the flood season, from June to September and only 100,000 during the remaining eight months. . . . In computing the quantity of water, Mr Everest made no allowance...
Page 526 - They are, even when in solid quartz, sometimes 70 feet deep, with smooth sides and quite plumb; what the tools were which enabled the miners to produce such work in hard, dense, quartz, no one appears to be able to suggest. The fragments of stone obtained from these various mines were pounded with hand mullers, the pounding places being still seen, and the pounded stone was then, it is believed, washed in a wooden dish and treated with mercury. The Korumbas or gold washers, who are admitted to be...
Page 531 - Gold is found in very small quantities in some of the streams flowing into the upper part -of the Malprabha, from both sides, through a region occupied by chloritic schists, with rather poor haematite schist intervening. The exact source of the gold supply remains to be determined. The yield is so exceedingly small that these streams are now but very rarely visited by the Jalgars, or gold-washers. Very few quartz veins occur in this region, and none were noticed with a north to south course.
Page 558 - The pebbles most commonly met with are ferruginous, gritty, and schistose sandstones, sandstone conglomerates, embedding rolled pebbles of quartz, chert, and jasper; claystone porphyry, with crystals of felspar; blue jasper, veined with oxide of iron ; coarse red jasper, and quartz crystals. Some of these pebbles have evidently been transported from the adjacent hills, but the porphyritic and felspathic pebbles must have travelled a much greater distance. Near the base of the hills the cotton soil...
Page 524 - I found that generations of washers had demarcated limits within which washing was remunerative, and these limits corresponded in a striking degree to the well-defined boundaries between two formations— the metamorphic and the sub-metamorphic. In the area occupied by the former, gold was not absent ; but its abundance, as contrasted with that in the latter, I ascertained, by two independent methods of calculation which are described below, was in the proportion of 1 to 3. Hence, as the washers...
Page 263 - S. latitude it is joined by its most important tributary, the Paraguay. Some of the branches of this river extend to within 12° of the equator, and are also fed by tropical rains; while others issue from the Cordilleros de los Andes, and are periodically swollen by the melting of the snows which rest on the high points of that range of mountains. For 700 or 800 miles, these mountains shed the waters which fall on their eastern slopes to the Paraguay or the Parana, and some smaller streams from the...

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