A Guide to the Phenomenology of Religion: Key Figures, Formative Influences and Subsequent Debates

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Bloomsbury Publishing, 15. juuni 2006 - 276 pages
The phenomenological method in the study of religions has provided the linchpin supporting the argument that Religious Studies constitutes an academic discipline in its own right and thus that it is irreducible either to theology or to the social sciences. This book examines the figures whom the author regards as having been most influential in creating a phenomenology of religion. Background factors drawn from philosophy, theology and the social sciences are traced before examining the thinking of scholars within the Dutch, British and North American 'schools' of religious phenomenology.

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Contents

Defining the Scope Phenomenology within the Academic Study of Religions
1
Key Ideas in the Philosophy of Edmund Husserl
9
Chapter 2 The Universal Experience of Religion in Ritschlian Theology
35
The Contributions of Troeltsch Weber and Jung to Phenomenological Thinking
67
Chapter 4 The Decisive Role of Dutch Phenomenology in the New Science of Religion
103
The British School of Phenomenology
141
North American Phenomenology at Chicago and in the Thought of W C Smith
171
Subsequent Debates in the Academic Study of Religions
209
Bibliography
249
Index
263
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About the author (2006)

James L. Cox is Emeritus Professor of Religious Studies, University of Edinburgh, UK and Adjunct Professor in the Religion and Society Research Cluster, Western Sydney University, Australia.

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