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CONTENTS.

PAGE

PREFACE

ix

CHAPTER I.

Introductory—God and our Country—Interest in our Volun

teers—First Impressions.......

9

CHAPTER II.

Slavery and the Rebellion-Organization of a Regimental

Church........

22

CHAPTER III.

Gauley Bridge, Western Virginia-General Cox at Flat-top

Hospital Scenes.........

40

CHAPTER IV.

.

Angels in the Hospital-Woman's Work-A Remarkable Death-bed.

62

CHAPTER V.

Flowers for the Sick-A Joke at the Chaplain's Expense.... 78

CHAPTER VI.

( What is a Woman Worth?" ---Soldier Mechanics - Pack's

Ferry.......

84

CHAPTER VII.

Changes-Sacramental Services---Battle at Bull Run-Fight at Frederick City, Md...

103 CHAPTER VIII.

PAGI

Battle of South Mountain--Bravery of the Twenty-third Ohio
Regiment—Incidents of the Field...

123

CHAPTER IX.

The Ideal and the Actual of War-"My Brother, O my : Brother!”Woman's Love and Sympathy.........

140

CHAPTER X.

Battle of Antietam-Heroic Bravery- The Stone Bridge

Death of Colonel Coleman-Treachery or Cowardice....... 147

CHAPTER XI.

A Gleam of Sunshine–The Dying Soldier and his Bible

164 The Loved One Remembered in Death......

CHAPTER XII.

Divine Service on the Field-Religious Comfort in the Hour of
Battle........

174

CHAPTER XIII.

A Terrible March-Soldiers' Prayers and a General's Purga

tory-Political versus Military Strategy.......

181

CHAPTER XIV.

Cold Knob-Bravery and Endurance— Rebels Caught Napping.

190

CHAPTER XV.

At Summerville-Religious Interests—The Prodigal's Return. 199

CHAPTER XVI.

The Soldier's Last Resting-place-Reveries in a Graveyard.... 209

CHAPTER XVII.

“Little Shady”—Beauties of Slavery.....

220 CHAPTER XVIII.

PAGE

The Army of the Cumberland-Rebels in Front, Meaner Rebels in Rear-Soldiers' Resolutions....

..... 225

CHAPTER XIX.

A Kidnapper Frustrated -- Tribute to a Christian Soldier

"Gottesacker" - Posterity and our Military Cemeteries... 236

CHAPTER XX.

A Beautiful and Impressive Scene-Living Water.......

244

CHAPTER XXI.

Hoover's Gap_Very Romantic— Hydropathy, Mutton, and
Conscience-A Brave Chaplain.........

.... 257

CHAPTER XXII.

Rosecrans's Strategy --Crossing Lookout- Perilous Position

of the Army.....

276

CHAPTER XXIII.

Battle of Chickamauga-Religious Services on the field

Turchin's Brigade-Cut Through or Surrender......

286

CHAPTER XXIV.

Wilder's Brigade and Longstreet's Veterans–Frightened Correspondents--God's Providence.......

307

CHAPTER XXV.

War is Dreadful-Brighter Days for our Country — Name

less Crimes –Irish Chivalry—"In de Cane-brake.”........ 316

CHAPTER XXVI.

Incidents of the Field-The "Old Flag yet !"--Letter from a Christian Soldier-An Adroit Movement....

328 CHAPTER XXVII.

PAGE

Secrets of Slavery - White Slaves — The Poor Whites-New
Application of Scripture.......

341

CHAPTER XXVIII.

The Dying Soldier's Dream of Home-The Sentinel-Life al
Battle....

354

CHAPTER XXIX.

Rebel Barbarities - National Cemetery at Chattanooga

Courage and Generosity....

372

APPENDIX

391

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It is said that a preface is seldom read. From this it has been inferred that it is unnecessary to write one. Some literary oracles have even gone further, and asserted that it is a violation of good taste to detain the reader at the threshold of a book, and compel him to endure several pages of prefatory explanations, which, at the best, are but covert egotisms, when, it is to be presumed, he is desirous of entering at once upon the work of examining the book itself. Others, with equal authority, declare that a proper regard for the claims of etiquette demands that strangers be introduced to each other by a third party, and that the same rule holds good in the literary world. Whatever opinion may be adopted on this not very important question, the general practice seems to be in favor of the timehonored custom of making at least a bow to the reader before thrusting upon his attention the full contents of a volume. It is generally safe, in matters of mere etiquette, to follow established customs. In the present instance it is considered not only safe, but necessary.

A few sentences will comprise all that need be said in this prefatory note.

And, first, the book is not a history of the war; it makes no such pretensions. Even in the brief sketches given of several severe battles, such as South Mountain, Antietam, Chickamauga, etc., no attempt is made at elaborate details. The sketches themselves are merely outline pictures, with

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