Bulletin of the United States Geological and Geographical Survey of the Territories, 4. köide

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Page 481 - Onward they came, a dark continuous cloud Of congregated myriads numberless, The rushing of whose wings was as the sound Of a broad river, headlong in its course Plunged from a mountain summit ; or the roar Of a wild ocean in the autumn storm, Shattering its billows on a shore of rocks.
Page 306 - ... system. On two main points every system yet proposed, or that probably can be proposed, is open to objection ; they are, — Istly, that the several regions are not of equal rank ; — :2ndly, that they are not equally applicable to all classes of animals. As to the first objection, it will be found impossible to form any three or more regions, each of which differs from the rest in an equal degree or in the same manner. One will surpass...
Page 681 - ... diameter. It is constructed in the same manner as those found on the alder. This striking difference in the form of the case may possibly be due to the difference in the form of the leaves of the food plant, the large, broad leaves of the alder inducing the larva to build a horn-like, much elongated case, while the narrow, smaller leaves of the sweet fern may have led to the formation of a short oval case. These differences are such as we would ordinarily regard as specific, but neither do the...
Page 485 - ... be entirely destroyed. After they have passed, nothing remains but the large branches and the roots, which being under ground have escaped their voracity." And in a late work of travels in the same country we find the following passage : — " During our ride (from Cordova to Seville) we observed a number of men advancing in skirmishing order across the country, and thrashing the ground most savagely with long flails. Curious to know what could be the motives for this Xerxes-like treatment of...
Page 547 - The only nest we found was placed on the ground, and neatly formed of dry fine grass. It was thinly arched over with the same material, and being built in a tuft of rank grass, was most thoroughly concealed. The bird would seem to be a close setter, as in this case the female remained on the nest till I actually stepped over it, she brushing against my feet as she went off'. The eggs were five in number, rather long and pointed, measuring about 0.90 by O.GO inches, of a grayish-white color, thickly...
Page 308 - Regions in the first place, from a consideration of the distribution of mammalia, only bringing to our aid the distribution of other groups to determine doubtful points. Regions so established will be most closely in accordance with those long-enduring features of physical geography, on which the distribution of all forms of life fundamentally...
Page 307 - Istly, that the several regions are not of equal rank ; — :2ndly, that they are not equally applicable to all classes of animals. As to the first objection, it will be found impossible to form any three or more regions, each of which differs from the rest in an equal degree or in the same manner. One will surpass all others in the possession of peculiar families; another will have many characteristic genera ; while a third will be mainly distinguished by negative characters. There will also be...
Page 296 - I close my account of it in the second volume of the Report of the United States Geological Survey of the Territories (p.
Page 525 - It contains from two to three thousand eggs, each of which is 1-3 mm. long and about one-third as wide, ellipsoidal, translucent, sordid white, with a delicate shell, and surrounded and separated from the adjoining eggs by a thin layer of the same white albuminous material which covers the whole. The outer layer forms a compact arch, with the anterior ends pointing inwards, and the posterior ends showing like faint dots through the white covering. Those of the marginal row lie flat on the attached...
Page 687 - The terminal edge of the wing is again pale or ruddy before the terminal black line. The fringes are blackish. The hind wings are pale yellowish white, shaded with fuscous on costal region and more or less terminally before the blackish terminal black line ; the fringes are dusky. Beneath the fore wings are blackish, marked with pale on costa; hind wings as on upper surface. Body blackish gray, with often a reddish cast on thorax above and on the vertex. The eyes are naked, the labial palpi long,...

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