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New Testament, 437. Mistrans- | Drummond, Sir William, 13.
lations in, 146, 191, etc., 203, n.,
and elsewhere.
Communication of Properties, doc-
trine of the, 124.
Complutensian Polyglot, 434-436,
478.

EADIE, Professor John, on Col. ii. 2,
3; 476.

Constantine, the Emperor, 97.
Constantinople, Council of (A. D.
381), 43, 123.

Conybeare and Howson, 207, n. 306,
n. 475, 476.

Cosri, the book, quoted, 238, n.
Councils. See Ancyra, Antioch,
Chalcedon, Constantinople, Ephe-
sus, Lateran, Nice.
"Create," use of the word to denote
a moral renovation, 291.
Cudworth, quoted, 98, 99, 105, 348,
349. Study of his work on the
Intellectual System recommend-
ed, 99, n.

Curetonian Syriac version, 450, n.
Cyril of Alexandria, 126-128, 450,
451, n. 456, 457. Quoted, 458, n.
Pseudo-Cyril, 463.

DEMONIACAL Possession, 417.
Damascenus. See Joannes Dama-

scenus.

Darkness. Figures representing a
day of utter darkness used to de-
scribe great national calamities,
278, 279.

Davidson, Dr. Samuel, 184, n. 189,
n. 446.

Davy, Sir Humphry, 14.
"Dead," the, metaphorical use of
the term, 264.

Death, Christian view of, 263. Use
of the term to denote the punish-
ment of sin, 262, 263.

66 Descending from heaven," figura-
tive meaning of the expression,
246, 247, 386, 391.
Devil. See Satan.
De Wette. See Wette.
Didymus of Alexandria, 450, 453,
454, n. 455.
Dioscurus, 128.

"Discourse," use of the word in the

sense of "reason," 369, 370.
Docetæ, 114.

Doctrina Orientalis, 369, 453.
Doddridge, 306, n. On Rev. i. 11;

481.

"Double Nature" of Christ. See
Hypostatic Union.

Eclectic Review, 187, n. 189, n.
190, n.

Education, moral and religious, 22-

25.

Eichhorn, 188, n.

El, use of the word, 300, n.
Eleazar, or Eliezer, Rabbi, 238, n.
Elohim, use of the word, 300, n.
Elzevir editions of the Greek Tes-
tament, 437.

Emanations, Cabalistic doctrine of,
350-352.

Emlyn, on Heb. i. 10-12; 214, n.
England, state of theology in, 15.
Ephesians, Epistle to the, 288.
Ephesus, General Council of (A. D.

431), 127. Another Council at
(A. D. 449), the "Council of
Banditti," 128.

Ephrem the Syrian, 456.
Epiphanius, 450, 451, 452, n. Quot-
ed, 454. Looseness of his cita-
tions from Scripture, 455, 456.
Erasmus, 93, n. 189, n. 197, n. 210,
n. 303, n. 306, n. His editions of
the Greek Testament, 434, 435.
Quoted, 480.

Error, language of, how far it may
be used, 420-422.
Errors of the Apostles, why not all
corrected by our Saviour, 410, etc.
Eunomius, 450, 459, 460, n.
Eusebius of Cæsarea, 93, n. 450,
452, n. 455, n. 461, 467. Quoted,
97, 213, 454, n. 462, n.
Eustathius of Antioch, 461, 462,

467.

Euthymius Zigabenus, 267, n. 464.
Eutyches, 128.

Excerpta Theodoti, 451, n.

FATHERS, the earlier, regarded the
Father alone as the Supreme
God, and the Son and Spirit as
far inferior, 42, 43, 45, 208-213,
365, 366; comp. 93, n. 113, 116,
120, n. 204, 205, 232, 233. Blend-
ed their philosophy with Chris-
tianity, 94, 95, 119, 120, 355, 374.
Borrowed their doctrine of the
Logos from Philo, 94, 316, 334,
338, 355. Opinions of the Fa-
thers concerning the Logos, 358-
373; on the Incarnation, 108-

123. Strange arguments of some
of them for the Trinity, 91, 92.
Use of their quotations from the
New Testament in textual criti-
cism, 439, 440. Their reading of
John i. 18; 450-467. Date of
the principal, 453-466.
Faustinus, on John i. 18; 465.
"Favor of Christ," the, 226.
Ferrandus, 450, 459, 461, n.

Flatt, J. F. von, on Rom. ix. 5;
207, n.

Flavian, 128.

Fleury, referred to, 106.

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Food, metaphors derived from tak- Griesbach, his critical labors, 439-

ing, 249, 250.

Foster, John, quoted, 158.
France, lesson taught by its relig-
ious history, 29.

Fritzsche, C. F. A., on Rom. ix. 5;
210, n.

Fulgentius, 450, 451, 452, n. 458.
Quoted, 459, n. On "the begin-
ning and the end," as a title of
Christ, 480.

GALE, Theophilus, on the Plato-
nism of the Fathers, 101.
Gaudentius, 450, 459, 461, n.
General Repository and Review, re-
ferred to, 105, n.
German philosophy, 14.
German theology, 16, 252.
Gesenius, on Isa. ix. 5; 183, n.
Gibbon, quoted, 95, 96, 129.
Gieseler, referred to, 416, n.
Gill, Dr. John, quoted, 66.
Glanvill, quoted, 370. His "Sad-
ducismus Triumphatus," 417,

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441. On the Received Text,
438. Referred to, 184, n. 185,
189, 213, n. 305, n. 443, 444, 445,
451, 470, etc.

Grotius, 93, n. 184, n. 189, n. 197, n.
301, n. 306, n. 476.
Guericke, or Guerike, 454, n. 455.

HACKETT, Professor H. B., on Acts
xx. 28; 184, n.
Hahn, 305, n.

Untrustworthiness
of his edition of the Greek Testa-
ment, 443-445.

Haldane, Robert, on Rom. ix. 5;
212, n.

See

Hammond, on Col. ii. 2, 3; 476.
"He," use of the pronoun without
an antecedent, 266, n.
"Heaven," proper meaning of the
word, as we use it, 388, 389.
"To ascend to heaven," "to be
in heaven," "to descend from
heaven," "to come from heaven,"
figurative meaning of the expres-.
sions, 246-248, 386, 391.
Kingdom of Heaven.
Hebrews, Epistle to the, not written
by St. Paul, 194, n.
Heinrichs, 184, n. 189, n.
Henderson, Dr. Ebenezer, on 1 Tim.
iii. 16, 187, n.; his errors, 189, n.
Hengstenberg, 183, n.
On Rev. i.
8; 480.
Heraclitus, 113.

Hermas, Shepherd of, 402. Quoted,
238, n.

Hezekiah, Rabbi, 238, n.
Hilary, on John i. 18; 450, 451,
452, n. 464, 465, n.
Hillel, Rabbi, 250.

Hindoos, the divine attributes hy-
postatized in their theology, 352,

853.

Hippolytus, 93, n. 461, 467. On JACKSON's edition of Novatian re-

Rom. ix. 5, 208–210.
Hofmann, J. C. K., on 1 John v. 20;
197, n.

Holy Spirit, personality and divini-
ty of the, 43, 64. Use and mean-
ing of the term, 311, 312. The
conception analogous to that of
the Logos, 312. The Holy Spirit
often confounded with the Logos
by the earlier Fathers, 312, n.
Hope, Thomas, 13, 14.
Horsley, Bishop, quoted, 91, 103.
Recommends the study of Cud-
worth, 99.

Howe, John, on the Trinity, 54.
Huet, his "Origeniana" referred to,
43, n.

Hug, J. L., 187, n.

Hume, David, quoted, 33, 34.
Hurd, Bishop, quoted, 82.
Huther, J. E., 189, n. 197, n. 306,
n. 442, 476, 477, 478, 479.
Hypostatic Union, 57-62. History
of the doctrine, 107-135, 303, n.
Language of Bacon, South, Watts,
and others, 129-134. Not a mys-
tery, but an absurdity, 169.

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ferred to, 43, n. 93, n. 112, n.
Jaspis, on 1 John v. 20; 197, n.
Jerome, 455.

Jerusalem, destruction of, and ex-
tinction of the Jewish nation,
how connected with the estab-
lishment of Christianity or the
figurative "coming" of Christ,
275-277.

JESUS CHRIST. The doctrine that
he is both God and man a con-
tradiction in terms, 57, 58, 169; it
turns the Scriptures into a book
of enigmas, 60, 61. The proposi-
tion, that he is God, proved to be
false from the Scriptures, 65-89;
it cannot even be understood in
any sense which is not obviously
false, 85-89. Taught his fol-
lowers to pray, not to himself,
but to God, 223, 229, 230. His
miraculous intercourse with his
Apostles and first followers, 225 -
228. The question of his pre-
existence, 234-253. Often spok-
en of personally, when his religion
is intended, 247-250, 268 - 284.
Confined his teaching to the es-
sential truths of religion, 412, 414
-427. Employed terms familiar
to his hearers in new senses, leav-
ing their meaning to be gradually
unfolded, 176, 177; comp. 284.
His divine authority, 17, 429. See
Apostles, "Coming," Hypostatic
Union, Judgment, Logos, Messiah.
Jewish nation. See Jerusalem.
Jewish opinions respecting the com-
ing of the Messiah and events
connected with it, 243, 250, 251,
389-406.

Jewish prejudices against Chris-
tianity, 80, 235, 257, 258.
Joannes Damascenus, on John i.
18; 464.

John, the Apostle, his purpose in
the Introduction of his Gospel,
321, 330; in the commencement
of his First Epistle, 329-331.
His style. 257; comp. 198, 266, n.
Not the author of the Apocalypse,
402, 409.

Johnson, Dr. Samuel, on Milton, 149.
Jowett, Professor Benjamin, 441.
On Rom. ix. 5; 472.
"Judge," use of the verb, 282.
Judgment of men by Christ, 68,

261, 262, 270, 271, 280–282, 284,
285.

Julian of Eclanum, 463, n.

which shone round Christ at his
transfiguration, controversy re-
specting, 416.

Julian, the Emperor, 452, n. 458, n. Literature of the day, absence of

462.

Junilius, on John i. 18; 466.
Justi, L. J. C., on Rom. ix. 5;
212, n.

Justin Martyr, on the incarnation

of the Logos, 108-110. Quot-
ed, 108, n. 109, 204, 205, 312, n.
359.

"KINGDOM of Heaven," or of God,

or of the Messiah, meaning of the
term, 176, 177; figurative lan-
guage connected with it in the
New Testament, 273, 274, 280,

281.

Knapp, 93, n. 305, n. 443, 444, 445,
446, 470, etc.

Köllner, on Rom. ix. 5; 210, n.
211, n.

Koppe, on Rom. ix. 5; 211, n.

Krehl, A. L. G., on Rom. ix. 5;
210, n.

Kuinoel, or Kühnöl, 93, n. 184, n.
302, n.

LACHMANN, 184, n. 189, n. 210, n.
300, n. 445, 449, 470, etc. His
editions of the Greek Testament,
440, 441, 443.

Lactantius, quoted, 366, n. 370, n.
Lamson, Dr. Alvan, referred to,
43, n.

Language, principles of its interpre-
tation, 138- 155. Intrinsic am-
biguity of, 138, 283, 284; causes,
141-147. Considerations to be
attended to by an interpreter of,
148, 149. Its literal meaning
often absurd, or false, 156-160.
So far as it has a meaning, it
must be intelligible; it cannot ex-
press incomprehensible mysteries,

161-169.

Lardner, 453, 461, n..

Lateran Council (A. D. 1215), 105.
Laurence, Archbishop, on 1 Tim.
iii. 16; 185, n.

LeClerc, 306, n. Quoted, 125, 127,
128, 371.

Leo I., Pope, 128.
Liberty, civil, true religion its only
safeguard, 25-29.

religious principle in the, 9 - 15.
Locke 32, 132, 200, n. 207, n.
212, n.

Logos, meaning of the term, 307,
369-372. Its use in the later Pla-
tonic philosophy, 308, 309. Per-
sonified the Wisdom of Solo-
mon, 310, 311. Naturalness of the
conception, 310. The Logos, at
first personified, afterwards hypos-
tatized, or conceived of as a proper
person, 313. Opinions of Philo,

314-316. St. John's use of the
term, 317-331. Regarded by
the Fathers of the first four cen-
turies both as an attribute and a
person, 355-364. Often identi-
fied with the Holy Spirit, and
with the Wisdom of God, 312, n.;
comp. 362, 363. Origen quoted
on the relation of the Logos to
the Wisdom of God, 356, 357.
The Logos partially identified
with God by the earlier Fathers,
365, 366. Conceived of as a man-
ifestation of God, 368, 369. The
uttered Logos, 369-372. Confu-
sion of ideas produced by con-
founding the different meanings
of the word, 372, 373. See Fa-
thers, Philo.

Lowth, Dr. William, on Isa. vi. 3;

182.

Lucian the martyr, 450, 459, 460, n.
Lücke, 197, n. 302, n.
Lünemann, G. C. G., 442, 477.
Luther, on Isa. ix. 5; 183, n.

MACKNIGHT, on Titus ii. 13; 306.
Mai, Angelo, 463, n.
Manuscripts, Greek, of the New
Testament, 188, n. 439, 449.
Punctuation in, 205, 206, 471.
Marcellus, 213, 450, 459, 460, n.
Marsh, Bishop, 184, n. Quoted, 434.
Martini, referred to, 43, n.
Matthæi's editions of the Greek Tes-
tament, 439-441.
Referred to,
457, n. 475, 477, 481.
Maurer, on Isa. ix. 5; 183, n.
Maximinus the Arian bishop, 452,

n. 465.

Mayer, Dr. Lewis, on Heb. i. 8, 9;

Light the substance of God, accord-
ing to the Cabalists, 351. Light | 301, n.

182, n. 183, n. 189, n. 250, n.

Messiah, the, Jewish expectations | Noyes, Dr. George R., referred to,
and feelings respecting, 243-245,
250, 251, 389-406. See Old Tes-
tament.

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Michaelis, J. D., 184, n. 197, n. 302,
n. 448.

Middleton, Bishop, 93, n. 185. His
"Doctrine of the Greek Article"
examined, 199 – 203, n.
Mill, Dr. John, 435. His edition of
the Greek Testament, 438, 439.
Millennium, doctrine of the, 406,
407, 409.

Milton, hyperbolical language used
concerning, by Johnson, Addison,
Bentley, and others, 149, 150.
Calls angels "gods," 300, n.
Monk's Life of Bentley, 103, 104.
Monophysite heresy, 128, 129.
Montagu, Richard, 462, n.
Montfaucon, 434, 466, n.
More, Henry, his "Antidote to
Atheism," 417, n.

Morus, on 1 John v. 20; 197, n.
Moses, remarkable language con-
cerning, 255, n.

Mosheim, quoted, 94, 95, 96, n. 126,
129. Referred to, 416, n.
Münscher, his "Dogmengeschichte"
referred to, 43, n. 112, n. Errors,
111, n. 120, n. Quoted, 122.
Münter, quoted, 117, 118.
Mysteries, 161.

"NAME," pleonastic use of the
word, 215, 216, 228.
"Nature," use of the word, 310.
Nature of Christ. See Hypostatic

Union.

Neander, quoted, 111, n. 371, n.
Referred to, 118, 197, n. 302, n.
306, n.

Nestorius, 126–128.

OERTEL, on Rom. ix. 5; 212, n.
Old Testament, affords no proof of
the doctrine of the Trinity, 181,
182; or of the deity of the Mes-
siah, 183, n. Allegorical inter-
pretation of the, 418, 419.
Olshausen, 184, n. 189, n. 476, 477.
Quoted, 211, n.

66

Omniscience, our idea of, 167 - 169.
"Only Son," or only-begotten
Son," meaning of the term as
applied to Christ, 220, 469, n.
Oriental style, 143, 236, 241, 249,
277, 278, 282, 287, 288, 409.
Origen, 93, n. 109, n. 314, 450, 451,
n. 452, n. Quoted, 120, n. 121,
362, 364, 366, n. On the incar-
nation of the Logos, 120-122.
On the relation of the Logos to
the Wisdom of God, 356, 357,
comp. 335, n. 362. On Prayer,
231-234. Denies that Christ is
"the God over all," 213. On the
Unitarianism of the great body of
believers, 374. Quotations of
John i. 18; 456, 457.
Orthodoxy, so called, 376-378.
Oudin, 464.

Ovid, quoted, 349.

PALEY has misrepresented the
character of Christian morality,

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Newcome, Archbishop, 93, n. 197,"
n. 306, n. On 1 Cor. x. 9; 474.
Newton, Sir Isaac, on 1 Tim. iii. 16;
189, n.

New York, State of, religious fanat-
icism in, 18, n.

Nice, Council of (A. D. 325), 42, 54,
122, 358, 359.

Noesselt, on Rom. ix. 5; 207, n.
Novatian, 93, n. 210.

Person," meaning of the word, in
reference to the Trinity, 40-42,
47-54.

Petavius, or Petau, his "Dogmata

Theologica" referred to, 43, n.
125, 416. Quoted, 100, 101, 362,
363.

Peter, the Apostle, probably not the
author of the Second Epistle
ascribed to him, 401.

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