Hope, T. Euphrosyne

Front Cover
Richard Griffin
J. Langdon, 1831
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 34 - He will never march, an' please your honour, in this world, said the corporal: He will march, said my uncle Toby, rising up from the side of the bed, with one shoe off: An' please your honour, said the corporal, he will never march, but to his grave: He shall march, cried my uncle Toby, marching the foot which had a shoe on, though without advancing an inch, — he shall march to his regiment...
Page 35 - There was a frankness in my uncle Toby, — not the effect of familiarity, — but the cause of it, — which let you at once into his soul, and showed you the goodness of his nature ; to this there was something in his looks, and voice, and manner, superadded, which eternally beckoned to the unfortunate to come and take shelter under him : so that before...
Page 34 - The sun looked bright the morning after to every eye in the village but Le Fevre's and his afflicted son's ; the hand of death pressed heavy upon his eyelids, and hardly could the wheel at the cistern turn round its circle, when my uncle Toby, who had...
Page 30 - I was answered, an' please your honour, that he had no servant with him; that he had come to the inn with hired horses, which, upon finding himself unable to proceed (to join, I suppose, the regiment), he had dismissed the morning after he came. — If I get better, my dear, said he, as he gave his purse to his son to pay the man, — we can hire horses from hence. But alas! the poor gentleman will never get from hence...
Page 30 - I was hearing this account, continued the corporal, when the youth came into the kitchen, to order the thin toast the landlord spoke of; — but I will do it for my father myself, said the youth. Pray let me save you the trouble, young gentleman...
Page 34 - Your honour knows," said the Corporal, " I had no orders."—" True," quoth my uncle Toby — " thou didst very right, Trim, as a soldier, — but certainly very wrong as a man. " In the second place — for which, indeed, thou hast the same excuse...
Page 31 - I heard the poor gentleman say his prayers last night, said the landlady, very devoutly, and with my own ears, or I could not have believed it. Are you sure of it ? replied the curate. A soldier, an' please your reverence, said I, prays as often (of his own accord) as a parson ; and when he is fighting for his king, and for his own life, and for his honour too, he has the most reason to pray to God of any one in the whole world. 'Twas well said of thee, Trim, said my uncle Toby. But when a soldier,...
Page 33 - Tis finished already, said the Corporal, — for I could stay no longer ; — so wished his Honour a good night. — Young Le Fevre rose from off the bed, and saw me to the bottom of the stairs ; and as we went down together, told me they had come from Ireland, and were on their route to join the regiment in Flanders. — But alas! said the Corporal, — the Lieutenant's last day's march is over ! Then what is to become of his poor boy ? cried my uncle Toby.
Page 28 - I am persuaded, said my uncle Toby, as the landlord shut the door, he is a very compassionate fellow, Trim, yet I cannot help entertaining a high opinion of his guest too. There must be something more than common in him, that, in so short a time, should win so much upon the affections of his host: And of his whole family, added the Corporal, for they are all concerned for him.
Page 30 - Honour is good: — and having done that, he sat down, as he was ordered, and began the story to my uncle Toby over again in pretty near the same words. I despaired at first, said the Corporal, of being able to bring back any intelligence to your Honour about the Lieutenant and his son ; — for when I asked where his servant was, from whom I made myself sure of knowing every thing which was proper to be asked, (That's a right distinction, Trim, said my uncle Toby) I was answered, an...

Bibliographic information