Philosophical Works, 3. köide

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Little, Brown, 1854
 

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Page 132 - To balance a large state or society (says he) whether monarchical or republican, on general laws, is a work of so great difficulty that no human genius, however comprehensive, is able by the mere dint of reason and reflection, to effect it The judgments of many must unite in the work: experience must guide their labor: time must bring it to perfection: and the feeling of inconveniences must correct the mistakes which they inevitably fall into, in their first trials and experiments.
Page 227 - Such a uniform and constant difference could not happen, in so many countries and ages, if nature had not made an original distinction between these breeds of men.
Page 227 - There never was a civilized nation of any other complexion than white, nor even any individual eminent either in action or speculation. No ingenious manufactures amongst them, no arts, no sciences.
Page 189 - Who knows but He, whose hand the lightning forms, Who heaves old ocean, and who wings the storms, Pours fierce ambition in a Caesar's mind...
Page 5 - NOTHING is more apt to surprise a foreigner, than the extreme liberty, which we enjoy in this country, of communicating whatever we please to the public, and of openly censuring every measure entered into by the king or his ministers.
Page 257 - Though it be certain that beauty and deformity, more than sweet and bitter, are not qualities in objects, but belong entirely to the sentiment, internal or external, it must be allowed, that there are certain qualities in objects which are fitted by nature to produce those particular feelings. Now, as these qualities may be found in a small degree, or may be mixed and confounded with each other, it often happens that the taste is not affected with such minute qualities, or is not able to distinguish...
Page 248 - ... coldness, and a false brilliancy : But when critics come to particulars, this seeming unanimity vanishes ; and it is found, that they had affixed a very different meaning to their expressions. In all matters of opinion and science, the case is opposite : The difference among men is there oftener found to lie in generals than in particulars ; and to be less in reality than in appearance. An explanation of the terms commonly ends the controversy ; and the disputants are surprised to find, that...
Page 40 - Honour is a great check upon mankind : But where a considerable body of men act together, this check is in a great measure removed , since a man is sure to be approved of by his own party, for what promotes the common interest . and he soon learns to despise the clamours of adversaries.
Page 86 - That there is a natural difference between merit and demerit, virtue and vice, wisdom and folly, no reasonable man will deny : Yet it is evident, that in affixing the term, which denotes either our approbation or blame, we are commonly more influenced by comparison than by any fixed unalterable standard in the nature of things. In like manner, quantity, and extension, and bulk, are by...
Page 228 - EUROPE, of whom none ever discovered any symptoms of ingenuity ; though low people, without education, will start up amongst us, and distinguish themselves in every profession. In JAMAICA, indeed, they talk of one Negro as a man of parts and learning ; but it is likely he is admired for slender accomplishments, like a parrot who speaks a few words plainly.

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