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To keep your earthly audit : Sure, in that
I deem you an ill husband; and am glad
To have you therein my companion.

Wol. Sir,
For holy offices I have a time; a time
To think upon the part of business, which
I bear i'the state; and nature does require
Her times of preservation, which perforce,
I, her frail son, amongst my brethren mortal,
Must give my tendance to.
King. You have said well.

Wol. And ever may your highness yoke together,
As I will lend you cause, my doing well
With my well saying!

King. 'Tis well said again;
And 'tis a kind of good deed, to say

well: And

yet words are no deeds. My father lov'd you :. He said, he did ; and with his deed did crown His word upon you. Since I had my office, I've kept you next my heart; have not alone Employ'd you where high profits might come home, But par’d my present havings, to bestow My bounties upon you. Wol. What should this means

[Aside. Sur. Now Heaven increase this business! [Aside. King. Have I not made you The prime man of the state? I

pray you,

tell

me,
If what I now pronounce, you have found true;
And, if you may confess it, say withal,
If you are bound to us, or no.

What say you ?
Wol. My sovereign, I confess, your royal graces
Showerd on me daily, have been more, than could
My study'd purposes requite; which went
Beyond all man's endeavours: my endeavours
Have ever come too short of my desires,
Yet, filld with my abilities:- I profess,
That for your highness' good I ever labour'd

More than mine own; that am, have, and will be.
Though all the world should crack their duty to you,
And throw it from their souls; though perils did
Abound, as thick as thought could make them, and
Appear in forms more horrid; yet my duty,
As doth a rock against the chiding flood,
Should the approach of this wild river break,
And stand unshaken yours.

King. "Tis nobly spoken :-
Take notice, lords, he has a loyal breast,
For
you have seen him open't.—Read o'er this;

[Giving him Papers. And after, this : and then to breakfast, with What appetite you have.

[Exit the King, frowning upon WOLSEY ; the

NOBLES following him, whispering and smil

ing. Wol. What should this mean? He parted frowning from me, as if ruin Leap'd from his eyes : So looks the chafed lion Upon the daring huntsman that has galld him; Then makes him nothing. I must read this paper ; I fear the story of his anger.—'Tis so; This paper has undone me:-'Tis the account Of all that world of wealth I've drawn together For mine own ends ; indeed, to gain the popedom, And fee my friends in Rome. O negligence, Fit for a fool to fall by! What cross devil Made me put this main secret in the packet I sent the king? Is there no way to cure this? No new device, to beat this from his brains ? I know, 'twill stir him strongly; yet I know A way, if it take right, in spite of fortune Will bring me off again. What's this-To the Pope ? The letter, as I live, with all the business I writ to his holiness. Nay then, farewell! I've touch'd the highest point of all my greatness;

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More than mine own; that am, have, and will be.
Though all the world should crack their duty to you,
And throw it from their souls; though perils did
Abound, as thick as thought could make them, and
Appear in forms more horrid; yet my duty,
As doth a rock against the chiding flood,
Should the approach of this wild river break,
And stand unshaken yours.

King. "Tis nobly spoken :-
Take notice, lords, he has a loyal breast,
For you have seen him open't.—Read o'er this;

[Giving him Papers. And after, this : and then to breakfast, with What appetite you have.

(Exit the King, frowning upon WOLSEY ; the

Nobles following him, whispering and smil

ing. Wol. What should this mean? He parted frowning from me, as if ruin Leap'd from his eyes : So looks the chafed lion Upon the daring huntsman that has gall’d him; Then makes him nothing. I must read this paper ; I fear the story of his anger.—'Tis so; This paper has undone me:- 'Tis the account Of all that world of wealth I've drawn together For mine own ends ; indeed, to gain the popedom, And fee my friends in Rome. O negligence, Fit for a fool to fall by! What cross devil Made me put this main secret in the packet I sent the king? Is there no way to cure this? No new device, to beat this from his brains? I know, 'twill stir him strongly; yet I know A way, if it take right, in spite of fortune Will bring me off again. What's this—To the Pope? The letter, as I live, with all the business I writ to his holiness. Nay then, farewell ! I've touch'd the highest point of all my greatness;

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