LIFE AND REMINISCENES OF GENERAL WM. T. SHERMAN

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Page 419 - first in war, first in peace, and first in the hearts of his countrymen.
Page 17 - And furthermore, as president of the Board of Supervisors, I beg you to take immediate steps to relieve me as superintendent, the moment the State determines to secede, for on no earthly account will I do any act or think any thought hostile to or in defiance of the old Government of the United States.
Page 35 - I repeat, you do General McPherson and myself too much honor. At Belmont you manifested your traits, neither of us being near. At Donelson, also, you illustrated your whole character. I was not near, and General McPherson in too subordinate a capacity to influence you.
Page 423 - Such was he : his work is done. But while the races of mankind endure, Let his great example stand Colossal, seen of every land, And keep the soldier firm, the statesman pure: Till in all lands and thro...
Page 451 - Gladstone, a not too friendly critic, has said that " as the British Constitution is the most subtle organism which has proceeded from progressive history, so the American Constitution is the most wonderful work ever struck off at a given time by the brain and purpose of man.
Page 119 - Hurrah! Hurrah! we bring the jubilee! Hurrah! Hurrah! the flag that makes you free!" So we sang the chorus from Atlanta to the sea, While we were marching through Georgia.
Page 37 - I believe you are as brave, patriotic, and just, as the great prototype Washington; as unselfish, kindhearted, and honest, as a man should be; but the chief characteristic in your nature is the simple faith in success you have always manifested, which I can liken to nothing else than the faith a Christian has in his Saviour.
Page 369 - You cannot qualify war in harsher terms than I will. War is cruelty, and you cannot refine it ; and those who brought war on our country deserve all the curses and maledictions a people can pour out.
Page 370 - Once admit the Union, once more acknowledge the authority of the National Government, and instead of devoting your houses, and streets, and roads to the dread uses of war, I and this army become at once your protectors and supporters, shielding you from danger, let it come from what quarter it may.
Page 68 - Some men think that modern armies may be so regulated that a general can sit in an office and play on his several columns as on the keys of a piano ; this is a fearful mistake. The directing mind must be at the very head of the army — must be seen there, and the effect of his mind and personal energy must be felt by every officer and man present with it, to secure the best results. Every attempt to make war easy and safe will result in humiliation and disaster.

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