Europe During the Middle Ages ...

Front Cover
Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, Green & Longman, 1833
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 188 - To relieve the poor, to clothe the naked, to visit the sick, to bury the dead, to help in tribulation, to console the afflicted. To make himself a stranger to the affairs of the world, to prefer nothing before the love of Christ...
Page 232 - ... families. His favourite employment was the study of the Scriptures, which he read much in the original. Next to Guthrie, I must mention Samuel Rutherford ; but how shall I mention him? Christians of the present day, knowing him chiefly by his letters, which glow with heavenly love, scarcely remember that he was one of the most learned men of his age.
Page 79 - ... followed by general hostilities. In one of their expeditions the fleet of the Pisans was almost destroyed by a tempest ; a second, by the enemy ; a third, after a bloody conflict off the isle of Meloria, was all but annihilated, and the loss in killed was five thousand, in prisoners eleven thousand. These prisoners the victors refused to ransom and for a reason truly Italian — that the retention of so many husbands in captivity would prevent their wives from renewing the population, and that...
Page 5 - Gepidas, whose skull, in conformity with a barbarous custom of his nation, he had fashioned into a drinking cup. Though he had married Rosamond, daughter of Cunimond, in his festive entertainments he was by no means disposed to forego the triumph of displaying the trophy. In one held at Verona, he had the inhumanity to invite his consort to drink to her father, while he displayed the cup, and, for the first time...
Page 213 - thou wishest to be perfect, go, sell all that thou hast, and give it to the poor, and thou shalt have treasure in Heaven ; and come, follow Me.
Page 79 - Pisa, and the consequent alliances — alliances of momentary duration — contracted in both 1 cities with the emperor, the pope, or the king of Naples, we cannot enter ; and if we could, nobody would thank us for the wearisome detail. As in Lombardy, the nobles were often banished, and as often recalled. The year 1282 is more famous in the annals of both republics, as the origin of a ruinous war between them. Pisa, with her sovereignty over Corsica, Elba, and the greater part of Sardinia ; with...
Page 6 - Rosamond, daughter of Cunimond, in his festive entertainments he was by no means disposed to forego the triumph of displaying the trophy. In one held at Verona, he had the inhumanity to invite his consort to drink to her father, while he displayed the cup, and, for the first time, revealed its his • tory in her presence.
Page 80 - ... to ransom and for a reason truly Italian — that the retention of so many husbands in captivity would prevent their wives from renewing the population, and that Pisa must in consequence decline. This infernal policy succeeded ; when, after sixteen years' warfare, peace was made, scarcely a thousand remained to be restored to their country. But Pisa had other enemies ; all the cities of Tuscany, with Florence at their head, entered into an alliance with Genoa to crush the falling republic, which...
Page 5 - Hoc ne cui videatur impossibile, veritatem in Christo loquor: ego hoc poculum vidi, in quodam die festo, Ratchis principem, ut illud convivis suis ostentaret, mam1 tenentem.
Page 79 - ... sovereignty over Corsica, Elba, and the greater part of Sardinia ; with her immense commerce, her establishments in Spain, Asia, and Greece, her revenues and stores, had little to gain and much to lose, by contending with a poor and perhaps braver power. If Genoa had less wealth, she had equal enterprise, an equal thirst for gain, and equal ambition. Where so much rivalry existed, it would easily degenerate into discord ; and petty acts of offence were followed by general hostilities. In one...

Bibliographic information